Advice on Heating warehouse space

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kc105

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Hi Everyone,

We just purchased a Metal building thats 4800 sq ft (60 x 80) of which 3000 sq ft is warehouse space and 1800 sq ft office. The ceiling height is 15 ft. Building has insulation in walls and ceilings & 2 overhead doors. Currently there's only electricity (3 phase available) in the building. The office is currently heated and cooled by a 1o year old york system, ducted with mostly flexible tubing throughout the office space. At this point, i'd like to start with the warehouse HVAC. My contractor has done a Heat Load for the 3000 sq ft and says I need 83K BTU's of Heat and 40k BTU's for Cooling. We've discussed several VFR systems.

At the moment my contractor is suggesting a Mitsubishi City Multi 8-ton hyper heating H2i heat pump PUHY-HP96TNU-A with 2 Inside Multi-Position Air Handler's Ducted PVFY-P54NAMU-E1 with Optional Electric Heat Kit

Some questions are;
Is it better to get 2 - 4 ton outside units?
Should we increase size of the Outside Unit to provide future expansion into the office space?
Will this be a very expensive way to heat the warehouse compared to oil or propane?
Will this system provide the heat needed on cold days?

Any advice is much appreciated. Thanks
 

Dana

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On systems that size it is sometimes cheaper to go with a ground source heat pump.

What methods did the contractor use to come up with the load numbers?

What capacity/size (and SEER/HSPF) is the York? Have you monitored it's duty cycle during both heating & cooling seasons?
 

kc105

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On systems that size it is sometimes cheaper to go with a ground source heat pump.

What methods did the contractor use to come up with the load numbers?

What capacity/size (and SEER/HSPF) is the York? Have you monitored it's duty cycle during both heating & cooling seasons?


Hi,
The contractor visited the building took measurements and sent a report from a software that looks to be called wrightsoft.
The existing york is 4 ton 10 seer according to the contractor.
I take ownership of the building next week and was unable to monitor or get any past bills from the seller as its been vacant for a few years.
Thanks
 

Sylvan

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Have you considered a back up generator?


I like redundancy so I would opt for 2 - 4 ton outside units? just in case one unit fails
 

Dana

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Hi,
The contractor visited the building took measurements and sent a report from a software that looks to be called wrightsoft.
The existing york is 4 ton 10 seer according to the contractor.
I take ownership of the building next week and was unable to monitor or get any past bills from the seller as its been vacant for a few years.
Thanks

Wrightsoft tools can cover a number of different load calculation types, some of which are appropriate for warehouses or commercial space, others (such as ACCA Manual-J) are only appropriate for residential. Ventilation rates used for different types of building uses make a HUGE difference in the total load numbers.

If you have the full printed report, verify that the measurements and assembly details used are pretty close to reality. This often takes a few hours to audit properly. Sometimes there are immediate glaring errors of commission, such as unrealistic outside & indoor design temperatures or insane indoor heat source levels. eg: A metals foundry has a lot more heat gain than a warehouse or office. A warehouse might only need to be heated to 55-60F. Offices will sometimes have high internal heat sources from equipment that is on 24/7 or high occupancy. High occupancy also requires higher ventilation rates, etc. Suffice to say, details matter.

A roughly rectangular code minimum residential building that size in MA would typically run a design heat load of about 55,000 - 60,000 BTU/hr , and a design cooling load of 36,000-40,000 BTU/hr (using an aggressive Manual-J) but this isn't a house.
 

kc105

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60-65F should be good enough for the warehouse.
One contractor is recommending Samsung DMVS Max Heat Unit with 360 Cassettes inside.
Anyone have experience with this equipment?
 

Cokomo

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Such a small space , I would think mini splits would do the job very nicely, given mid to high 70’s for heat would never be necessary. Do a proper heat loss .
 

Fitter30

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What will be in the warehouse? Is there a large garage door and now much traffic? Mini splits don't handle dirty conditions cleaning indoor units gets costly. Garage doors in winter open them up for a few minutes wipes out all the heat without having a heater blowing towards the door to offset the load.
 
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