Zurn 1-1/14 inch Water Pressure Regulator

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Brad_S

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My home has a 1-1/4 inch Zurn Wilkins water pressure regulator that sits on top of the main incoming water line. I had a plumber out to do some work and he tested my home PSI at about 95. He recommended a new unit and quoted a price at $500. I wanted to get a few bids and verify the situation so I declined to have the work done there and then.

I have heard no water hammering and had no idea there was even a pressure situation.

Since I have Culligan water softeners installed in my house which are swapped monthly (my area has VERY hard water) I asked them if they could verify this. Their tech came out and tested the water pressure. It was 75.

I bought my own test gauge and have been testing for the last three days. Doing tests on the cold water valve on my tankless water heater and outside front hose bib the tests have all been around 75 except one test done in the morning. That one was at 95. I tested the same bib 30 minutes later and it was 78.

The install looks fairly simple, but I am not a plumber. I've gotten some bids as high as $450 (this is for install alone, excluding price of the $225 part)

This seems like a simple install but wondered if its worth paying to have it done, and what are some of the pitfalls you can run into when installing one of these? My Culligan tech said its a simple install but he's probably more familiar with this work then I am.
 

Reach4

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I bought my own test gauge and have been testing for the last three days. Doing tests on the cold water valve on my tankless water heater and outside front hose bib the tests have all been around 75 except one test done in the morning. That one was at 95. I tested the same bib 30 minutes later and it was 78.
1. Is the hose bib teed off before or after the PRV?
2. Understand that even with a PRV working and set to 75 and even lower psi, you can get 95 and higher quite normally due to thermal expansion. If you want your readings to not be affected by the thermal expansion effect, either slowly dribble water from a faucet as you take readings, or turn off the WH, use some water, and then take readings.
3. What situation would tell you you need a new PRV? If just the 75 and 95 numbers, and your WH has been doing thermal expansion, the existing PRV may be working perfectly.
 

Brad_S

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1. Is the hose bib teed off before or after the PRV?
2. Understand that even with a PRV working and set to 75 and even lower psi, you can get 95 and higher quite normally due to thermal expansion. If you want your readings to not be affected by the thermal expansion effect, either slowly dribble water from a faucet as you take readings, or turn off the WH, use some water, and then take readings.
3. What situation would tell you you need a new PRV? If just the 75 and 95 numbers, and your WH has been doing thermal expansion, the existing PRV may be working perfectly.


First off let me say thank you for your advice. I do appreciate it.

The bib is after the PRV. I had a Culligan tech in and we did a pressure test. The pressure dropped about 15 to 20 psi when we turned on a faucet in the house. He said that indicated possible PRV failure, that turning on one faucet should not drop home PSI it by that much. The plumber that first diagnosed the high pressure issue never mentioned anything about thermal expansion possibly causing it- I had a feeling he was not telling me the full story, thats why I did not order the repair right then and there.
 

Breplum

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Zurn/Wilkins are a very decent line of PRVs.
The higher priced PRVs have higher flow characteristics than the lower priced models.
The 70XL is lowest good model, followed by the NR3XL in all brass.
Off the top of my head, both have internal bypass so thermal expansion should not be an issue.
Always buy the DU -aka double union series. That makes it easy as pie to swap out. The rebuild kits are generally so high priced that they are not worth rebuilding if you have double unions.
I would not worry about the drift to 95psi if it is not there consistently.

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Reach4

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The bib is after the PRV. I had a Culligan tech in and we did a pressure test. The pressure dropped about 15 to 20 psi when we turned on a faucet in the house. He said that indicated possible PRV failure, that turning on one faucet should not drop home PSI it by that much.
Look at the tag and get the model number. With that get the documentation, and clean the screen. That could be the cause of your excessive pressure drop with use.
 

Brad_S

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Zurn/Wilkins are a very decent line of PRVs.
The higher priced PRVs have higher flow characteristics than the lower priced models.
The 70XL is lowest good model, followed by the NR3XL in all brass.
Off the top of my head, both have internal bypass so thermal expansion should not be an issue.
Always buy the DU -aka double union series. That makes it easy as pie to swap out. The rebuild kits are generally so high priced that they are not worth rebuilding if you have double unions.
I would not worry about the drift to 95psi if it is not there consistently.

Thank you- it is the Double Union type. I will keep doing a weekly check and replace it if need be. Thank you again for your advice.
 

Jeff H Young

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Tankless water heater should eliminate thermal expansion or reduce it greatly.
Most PRV when going bad or getting worn allow pressure to creep up, basicaly instead of holding pressure back its leaking internaly a very small amount allowing pressure to eventual equall the incoming pressure.
In my area all the homes are built bettween 2008 and around 1996 Unless its a complaint by owner or Ive got a small job that went really quick I usually dont bother checking. 20 years old with 100 plus psi Its bad in my area almost every time and when customer dosent know what a PRV I might not want to talk them into the job especialy if they are strapped for cash or dont want to part with it, I make sort of a judgement call on overall apearance of if home seems maintained
450 plus parts not exactly cheap. Size matters greatly we have 1 1/2" water main and some homes around here have Galvinized piping at main. If its a 1 inch with copper Ill put a new ball valve hose bib and reg for less than that including parts. You could probebly get a price of double that (900)from companys that advertize around L.A.
 
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