Turning kitchen shut off valve makes water turn black

Users who are viewing this thread

Jonnh

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
San Francisco
We just moved into a new rental. I noticed that when I open and close the kitchen faucet shut off valve, and then turn on the water at the faucet, the water will come out clear at first for about a second, then it'll turn black for a half a second, then it'll turn clear again. I think there is probably an o ring or bushing in the valve that is wearing out, and it's agitated every time I turn the shut off valve. This happens with both the cold and hot water valves.

Is this common? Should I ask my landlord to have both valves replaced? This is a little concerning because it's our source of drinking water.

The building we are living in was constructed in 2007, for what is worth.

Thanks in advance.
 

breplum

Licensed plumbing contractor
Messages
908
Reaction score
329
Points
63
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
The rubber washers naturally break down from the water over time. As long as they still work fully as shut offs, then no big deal.
The modern stop valves we use are stainless steel ball with teflon seats, and don't go bad that way.
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
2,445
Reaction score
632
Points
113
Location
Iowa
That blackness is the washer that closes the valve, being washed away. That means your valve is getting old and should be replaced soon.
 

Plumber Jamie

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Vancouver, Canada
I'd replace the washers in your shut-off valves. Once they start to break down, pieces can break off and get stuck in the faucet supply line, reducing or even fully blocking the flow. Most of the time I find people do not want to wait for the warranty supply line in the mail and fork out more money than they need for a new faucet. I don't know if it is the same where you live but where I am the multi-turn shut-off valves are pretty much universal. The washers are easily replaced, though in some cases the set screw is rusted in place. As I said, they are the same where I am from so when the set screw is rusted you can usually take the stem from a new one and install it in the old valve body. This does require shutting the water to the house down though.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks