Submersible pump question

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Dajack2125

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I moved into a home that at one time had a submersible pump. Township ran water and sewer lines and forced everyone to hook up to the new lines. The pump sat unused still in the well for quite some time. Township has kept on raising water rates and will continue to do so because their is nothing we can do about it. With water rates so high I had this brainstorm to get the old well running again for irrigation purposes only. I pulled the electrical wire up from the casing and plugged it into an extension cord. Worked for a little bit, then quit on me. I pulled the old pump up, which was about 200 feet down, and examined the pump to see if I could get it working. Nope. After this novel I have just written my question is can someone recommend a mid priced pump to replace the one that is bad. I don't want to spend a great deal of money in case it doesn't work, but I don't want to go cheap in case it does. The well casing is 6" in diameter.
Thanks
 

Reach4

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Is the pump a 220 volt pump, and you applied 120 volts to it?
 

Sarg

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Another new concept ......... I've never knew that you could get a submersible pump for a well 200 feet down that is a 120 volt.
 

Bannerman

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Another new concept ......... I've never knew that you could get a submersible pump for a well 200 feet down that is a 120 volt.
The location of the pump in the well, will be less relevant compared to the level of water in the well, any vertical elevation difference to the home, and the pressure switch pressure setting.

As a simplified example, the pump maybe located 500' below the surface, but if the well is located at an equal elevation as the home, and if the level of water within the well remains only 10' below the surface, then the pump will only be required to lift water vertically 10' (~ 5 psi) to the surface, + deliver sufficient pressure to satisfy the pressure switch cut-out pressure (ie: 60 psi (~ 139') for a 40/60 PS setting) + at least an additional 10 psi (~23') safety margin to ensure the PS cutout pressure will always be achieved even if the well's water level is ever marginally lower.

For this example, the pump would need to be capable of supporting at least 172 feet of total dynamic head, but if the well is located at a lower elevation than the home, then the pump will need to be capable of additional TDH to compensate for the difference in elevation to achieve at least 70 psi (60 + safety margin) in the home.

If the well's water level drops lower than 10', then the pump will need to be capable of lifting water the additional vertical distance + the PS cutout + elevation difference + safety margin.
 

Reach4

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Another new concept ......... I've never knew that you could get a submersible pump for a well 200 feet down that is a 120 volt.
While you can, I am still a bit suspicious that this is one. OP did not cite any markings on the pump motor.
 

Dajack2125

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Another question. As this pump is going to be for watering outside plants only, is it possible to hook up a garden hose bib to the discharge line of the pump, without having to use a pressure tank? If I am understanding correctly, the on/off rapid cycles of a pump is what does the most damage to the pump. So I 'm thinking, why not just eliminate the tank? Thanks again
 

Reach4

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Yes. Just don't block off the hose for long periods without turning the pump off.
 

Bannerman

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is it possible to hook up a garden hose bib to the discharge line of the pump,
It is the pressure switch and pressure tank that allows the garden hose bib to be simply opened to activate the pump automatically when water is needed. Without those devices, the pump would need to be manually activated when water is needed, and the pump would need to be manually shut down when no further water is needed.

Without a pressure tank & switch, depending on the pump's capabilities, the pressure supplied to one sprinkler maybe excessive, but will be reduced when additional sprinklers or other water use occurs at the same time. To obtain consistent pressure with no cycling while running one or multiple sprinklers/devices at the same time, consider installing a PK1A Pside-Kick kit between the pump outlet and the garden hose bib(s), available from the Cycle Stop Valves company located in Texas.

Cycle Stop Valves PK1A kit
 

Valveman

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Thanks. I plan on turning the pump off after each use.
Like they say, "Man plans and God laughs". It may not be you, but someone will probably turn off the faucets and forget to turn off the pump. It only takes one time to destroy the pump. At least put a 75 PSI pressure relief valve in the system if you don't make it where it can automatically turn itself off.
 

Dajack2125

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Like they say, "Man plans and God laughs". It may not be you, but someone will probably turn off the faucets and forget to turn off the pump. It only takes one time to destroy the pump. At least put a 75 PSI pressure relief valve in the system if you don't make it where it can automatically turn itself off.
I do appreciate your input. That is a great idea on putting a pressure relief valve in there. Do you sell the valve and how would I go about installing it. Thanks
 

Reach4

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Pressure relief valves are commonly available at places selling other well stuff. Typically they open at 75 psi. Some are officially adjustable. Some are unofficially adjustable.

examples: https://www.menards.com/main/plumbi...lve/rv50/p-1444446042298-c-8672.htm?exp=false

If your pump will not readily make 75 psi, you need to release water at a lower pressure.
 
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