Shut Off Valve Requirements

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HereInOhio

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I’m adding a bathroom to my basement and struggling with the supply lines. Mainly with how to arrange shut off valves so it doesn’t look hacked together.

From the right I have the main supply lines coming into the utility closet. The main lines go up to the first floor to supply the whole house, I was going to install a shut off for each once split off. The new bathroom will be to the left. Originally I was going to have a shut off for the hot and cold for everything in the new bathroom. Obviously the toilet and lav will have their own shut off valves at the fixture. The issue I see is if there’s a problem with the shower the whole bathroom will be shut down. I searched past post and looked up IPC which says you need shut offs at each fixture besides showers and baths. Is this ok or would you suggest I run a line to the shower with its own valves and another independent line to the lav and toilet? If separate lines I’m assuming I still need(want) a shut off for that trunk despite everything having its own shut off valve.

I’m just trying to picture the branch going up, shower going left, other branch line going down all with valves scattered around. Everything is crammed to the left side with little room for a bunch of valves unless I have zig zags of piping, which I’m not opposed to if it’s the right way.

Any input would be appreciated!
 

John Gayewski

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A drawing would be better.

Every tee should have a shut off. Placing all of the stuff so it's accessible can be an issue so there's a give and take. But you should provide an access panel with valves for the shower
 

HereInOhio

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A drawing would be better.

Every tee should have a shut off. Placing all of the stuff so it's accessible can be an issue so there's a give and take. But you should provide an access panel with valves for the shower
I’ll be at that house later and will take a picture. I have a “utility closet” with the ejector pump, main clean outs, these valves and rest of the plumbing running through so access isn’t an issue.

It’s more that everything is cramped to the left side but just typing it out made me think of a few ideas (splitting it sooner and just have a few more 90’s but everything should be organized). Still would like to get pros opinions.
 

HereInOhio

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There exist shower rough-ins with integrated shut-offs.
I read something about that earlier when searching the forum. I have the space so that’s not an issue, it’s more arranging it so it looks neat and how to deal with the pipes crossing over each other.
 

HereInOhio

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There exist shower rough-ins with integrated shut-offs.
Looking up these faucets they appear more common than I assumed. I expected their cost to be significantly higher. Based on this I could just put shut offs for the main house and although not necessary but probably preferred I would install a separate shut off for the entire bathroom. Hmmmm…..
 

HereInOhio

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A drawing would be better.

Every tee should have a shut off. Placing all of the stuff so it's accessible can be an issue so there's a give and take. But you should provide an access panel with valves for the shower

Looking at the ground you can see the outline of where the walls will go for the utility closet. Originally I was trying to put the valves inline and keep the 90's to a minimum by hugging the left side of the utility closet which was making it too difficult to fit the valves in. I ended up making somewhat of a manifold and mounting all of the valves to a board to keep them organized. Some of the lines are ran but I highlighted them and the intended location once complete so it hopefully makes more sense.

Although the board keeps it organized it looks hacked together to me. Any suggestions of either moving it somewhere else in the closet, different direction or any way to make it look more professional?

Excuse the sloppy purple primer on the drain pipes, I replumbed the house when I was in my early 20's and didn't know better.

Supply Lines.GIF
 

John Gayewski

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It doesn't look too bad. The bottom one maybe spin it and get rid of the 180° routing. Maybe move the bottom manifold down and swoop down to it instead of overlapping the manifolds.
 

Jeff H Young

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if you had to turn your water off once in 10 years for an hour would it be that bad. many shower valves have shut offs beaneath the trim plate.
I can understand perfection but having 20 extra valves means having 20 more valves to fail
 

HereInOhio

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if you had to turn your water off once in 10 years for an hour would it be that bad. many shower valves have shut offs beaneath the trim plate.
I can understand perfection but having 20 extra valves means having 20 more valves to fail
I agree and that's where my original thought of just having one set of valves to control the whole bathroom downstairs. In this case you would still have two other bathrooms. I ended up splitting it though, it was 7 valves vs. 5 valves so not the end of the world. I was spending too much time thinking about it so just figured I would overdo it and move on.
 

HereInOhio

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It doesn't look too bad. The bottom one maybe spin it and get rid of the 180° routing. Maybe move the bottom manifold down and swoop down to it instead of overlapping the manifolds.
I was trying to keep them aligned that's why I didn't point the last valve the other way. I may just point it down, we'll see. Thanks for the suggestion.

The bottom manifold is spaced evenly and not overlapped if I understand what you are saying. It looks like it is in the picture since the pex is bent out, I just need to secure it down but he line runs down left of the first one. This pic may show better.

I just feel like there is a cleaner looking way than what I did now.

Manifold.png
 
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