Short inlet for wall tube - how to address?

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Jared248

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Hello,
I have installed a new vanity and upon reinstalling the plumbing, I came across a few issues. I've include a picture to reference:
  1. I tried to maintain the wall tube that was previously there, but with the slight movement of the re-install I seemed to have jarred the seal at the wall. There is a lot of pipe dope there already so I am inclined to think this was a quick fix for a previous leak. If the wall inlet is very short, is there a good way to address this when buying/installing a new wall pipe/p-trap? There is a very slow drip and only when the sink is full and drained.
  2. If I replace the wall pipe, is it wise to move to fully plastic?
  3. More of a note but I had used a flex downpipe since the current wall pipe extends ~1 inch further than the sink drain... I'd like to get away from using this especially if I'm replacing the wall pipe and have the ability to shorten it by an inch or so.
Thanks for the help!
Jared
 

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Reach4

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I tried to maintain the wall tube that was previously there, but with the slight movement of the re-install I seemed to have jarred the seal at the wall. There is a lot of pipe dope there already so I am inclined to think this was a quick fix for a previous leak. If the wall inlet is very short, is there a good way to address this when buying/installing a new wall pipe/p-trap? There is a very slow drip and only when the sink is full and drained.
The thing you call a wall tube is usually called the trap arm of a p-trap. The thing that stops the leakage is a washer. The washer is probably 1-1/2 inch, but if the trap is 1-1/4, you would use a reducing gasket. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbil...with-Rubber-Reducing-Washers-C2698C/205154062 gives you one of each, plus a new nut.
If I replace the wall pipe, is it wise to move to fully plastic?
Each works. Plastic is easier to cut and costs less.
More of a note but I had used a flex downpipe since the current wall pipe extends ~1 inch further than the sink drain... I'd like to get away from using this especially if I'm replacing the wall pipe and have the ability to shorten it by an inch or so.
Yes. You can get tailpiece extensions which are not flexible/corrugated.
 
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