Moving basement bathroom rough-in; cast iron under slab

Users who are viewing this thread

arkanos

New Member
Messages
13
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Kentucky
I'm planning to finish our basement which includes installing a 3/4 bath. The existing rough-in is terribly placed and basically unusable for anything other than a 1/2 bath, and it would require walling in one of the 2 basement windows.

There is an sewage ejector sump that is original to the house (1978) and, to my knowledge has never been used or even plugged in. There are 5 cast iron stubups; shower, shower vent, toilet, toilet vent, and sink (which goes on to vent). The new bathroom location will be between the existing stub ups and the ejector pump.

I've got a few ideas/decisions to make, and was looking for insight from anyone who has approached this problem before.

1) The ejector pump needs to be replaced since it has been sitting for 45 years. Is this something that I should hire out, or is it easily doable? I have replumbed an entire bathroom's DWV before so I'm no stranger to it, but this just seems like it could be more of a specialty thing.

2) I have no idea what the piping route under the slab looks like. I assume the shower and sink Y into the 4" toilet line at some point. Is there an easy way to trace the piping under the slab? Otherwise I'll basically have to cut up concrete across the pipings' potential route just to locate it.

3) Is there a way to determine the condition of the piping? Since I planned to intercept it and splice into it with PVC, I don't want to reuse it if it's rusting or corroded somewhere else under the slab. I'm assuming that, since they basically sat unused for ~40 years, it's likely in decent condition?
 

wwhitney

In the Trades
Messages
6,505
Reaction score
1,810
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
On (2) only, if you provide an accurate dimensioned floor plan showing the location of the ejector pit, all the stub ups (with sizes), and any vent rough in above, I'm sure there are people here who could make good educated guesses about what it looks like under the slab. You'd still have to cut the slab to verify, reposition, and tie-in, but it might save you some concrete breaking.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
8,588
Reaction score
2,103
Points
113
Location
92346
If you were reluctant to make an educated guess on the main to the pit you could have it professionaly located. however in most cases its pretty straight foward and easy . but not nesessarily
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks