Main Water Line Basement Entrance - Does this look OK?

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indigo

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I've attached a picture of where my main municipal water line enters my basement through the floor.

I don't have any problems with it, but until recently the hole was sealed by some packed in rags covered in spray foam... this was not great to look at so I figured I would investigate. I believe this was the result of the installation of the ball valve. Does this connection look ok?

I'd also add that at the bottom of the ball valve there appears to be some green corrosion, which seems to be from water condensing on it? It is winter here, so the incoming water is cold, is this normal?

This brings me to the real question, which is what is the best way to seal this up? I was thinking maybe some gravel and then a very thin layer of cement so that if one needed access to this pipe under the floor that it would be relatively easy.

I think it's a lead pipe, is there anything I should be careful with as far as chemical interactions between the pipe and concrete?

EDIT: I've added additional pictures.
 

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Chamber

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Water lines do not use lead pipe. It looks like it may be galvanized steel. In any case, gravel or sand topped with concrete should be fine.
 

Terry

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I can't tell by the picture if it's galvanized or not. I have heard that some cities use lead, but being in the Seattle area, have never seen that used for water. I know that Flint Michigan used lead.
With copper lines, I wrap those before exposing them with cement. There is a UPC rated tape for that.
 

Reach4

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http://apps.pittsburghpa.gov/pwsa/Lead_Service_Line_Information.pdf
Lead service lines are generally a dull gray color and are very soft. You can identify them easily by carefully scratching with a key. If the pipe is made of lead, the area you've scratched will turn a bright silver color. Do not use a knife or other sharp instrument and take care not to puncture a hole in the pipe.​
 

indigo

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http://apps.pittsburghpa.gov/pwsa/Lead_Service_Line_Information.pdf
Lead service lines are generally a dull gray color and are very soft. You can identify them easily by carefully scratching with a key. If the pipe is made of lead, the area you've scratched will turn a bright silver color. Do not use a knife or other sharp instrument and take care not to puncture a hole in the pipe.​

Based on that (who would have thought local government was putting out useful information) I think it's lead, which is not a surprise given the age of the house. The solder bulb is the giveaway, I'll give it a gentle scratch at some point
 

jadnashua

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Lead was an upgrade to water pipes...some places in Massachusetts still have some hollowed out logs for water pipes! FWIW, after a fairly short while, the lead gets a coating on it, and isn't necessarily an issue...depends on the water quality and treatment chemicals used. Choose the wrong treatment, as was done in Flint, MI, and you can a major scandal and health issue.
 

hj

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The major issue with lead is HOW to connect it to ANYTHING else. None of those connections, although the photos are not the best quality, indicate that it is a leak pipe. you would be hard pressed to "puncture" a lead pipe or damage in any material way with a knife.
 
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