Kitchen sink strainer, plastic body?

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wwhitney

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All 3 of the kitchen/utility sinks I purchased recently came with plastic body strainers. [2 of them are American Standard 7301839-201.002, see below.]

Is it worth replacing them with metal body strainers? The main thing I notice is the plastic body seems quite tall. I imagine it would be durable enough for the application, I don't usually pound on the strainer body.

If metal body, do we prefer stainless steel or brass, performance wise?

Thanks,
Wayne

s-l1600.jpg
 

Terry

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No matter what basket you install, it will be replaced at some point. The plastic one shown should be okay, though I like to have the ones below on the truck for replacements as they are very nice. They still lose their finish over time, but I like how the baskets work.

jomar-baskets.jpg


jomar-snap-n-loc-2.jpg


jomar-snap-n-loc-1.jpg


sink-basket-bottom.jpg
 
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Jeff H Young

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Terry's do look nice I just came back from a leaker too much putty on ss thin sink . It was sort of favor job and was only a year old . the strainer was junk but re used when I say junk mostly the ears on the nut gave me a fit and stupid me has never owned a darn proper spanner.
As Terry mentioned they aren't really a forever part but a real good one pretty much is . I'd say be your own judge Wayne no big deal either way utility sink in basement or a modest job go with what you got . spending a years wages or 2 on a remodel you may want a bit more quality. Bay area so expensive that you may not want to cheap out. I consider all those things plus budget of owner to decide
 

Tuttles Revenge

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The single advantage of the plastic basket strainer is that tightening it from atop with a screwdriver or socket eliminates the chances of it being offcenter as you're tightening with a pliers. The next best is the one in Terry's photo, I really miss the old Jomar Snap-N-Lok double cup strainers.. when they were actual machined threads.. they're kinda junky now with slightly better than pressed threads. Don't put too much putty in that will just sqoosh out.. you'll still need to go back and give it a bit of tightening after the initial putty squooshes out.
 
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