How on earth do I remove this faucet?

Users who are viewing this thread

LDX

New Member
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
British Columbia
For most of you this will be a silly simplistic question, but I just can't figure it out. Hope you can assist.

I have an American Standard Hampton 2 handle wide spread bathroom faucet. It's about 20 years old. I am trying to remove it from a pedestal sink.
I was able to remove the supply lines and and T that mixes the hot and cold. The T was leaking. Might just replace the whole faucet but I can't find a way to remove the hot and cold faucet handles.
Please see the photo. The issue is I cannot find any kind of wrench that will span the 'nut' pattern that is about 32mm, and even if I could there is extremely limited room to crank on the 'nut' to loosen it. And if I could find a tool to grip it, how do I stop the whole unit from spinning around instead.

What can I do? Is there some kind of tool made to remove this?


IMG_0653.jpg



Thank You!!
 

Jeff H Young

In the Trades
Messages
9,187
Reaction score
2,315
Points
113
Location
92346
remove handles on top then the escutions and there are big nuts almost like what we see on the underneath unscrew those and they puyll out the bottom . for the spout you can see the nut to take off
 

Breplum

Licensed plumbing contractor
Messages
2,006
Reaction score
827
Points
113
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
The supply nut can be a bear if you don't have the original tool that came with the faucet.
Most of us older plumbers have a reasonable assortment.
 

LDX

New Member
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
British Columbia
I don't have the tool. The faucets came with the house. Any suggestions on how I might remove it? Is there any kind of tool designed to remove a 32/33mm nut vertically. I see there are those plastic grip vertical tools but I don't know if any are intended to remove a 32mm nut
 
Last edited:

LDX

New Member
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
British Columbia
I don't have the tool. The faucets came with the house. Any suggestions on how I might remove it? Is there any kind of tool designed to remove a 32/33mm nut vertically. I see there are those plastic grip vertical tools but I don't know if any are intended to remove a 32mm nut

Additional issue just popped up, again see photos. Not sure what I did while removing the various supply lines but seems like I somehow messed up the left side valve seat. It is now about 1mm below flush compared to the right valve seat. The right cold side is flush, the valve turns smoothly when handle is reattached. The left hot side is recessed 1mm causing the escutcheon to sit too low and scrape against the chrome plate. Strange, I have no idea how this might have happened. I wonder if it's somehow related to my original question on how to remove the faucet handles on each side. Not sure if this is now damaged and needs replacement or is it the result of something coming loose now.

Thanks folks, see photos below (top photo is the messed up recessed one)

View attachment 93795View attachment 93796
Could it be that I unknowingly twisted the pipe underneath the hot side and caused it to become recessed? If it grabbed the pipe underneath with a vice grip or something and twisted it clockwise (looking up from under the sink) then would it cause this recessed part to go back up? Hopefully I didn't break some kind of loctite thread seal?

But most of all, just can't think of any tool I can fit under the sink to remove the 32mm nut holding the faucet handles on.

Thanks!
 

WorthFlorida

6th clinical trail chemotherapy 5/15/24
Messages
5,799
Solutions
1
Reaction score
1,005
Points
113
Location
Orlando, Florida
It’s the #11 lock but that I cannot turn off. Mine doesn’t have the fins to grip it
Are trying to repair the faucet or changed it out?

#10 you turn. May have to use channel locks to get a grip. If #11 turns with #10, stick a screw driver in it and it hit the side of the sink. A basin wrench may work.
 

LDX

New Member
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
British Columbia
Most likely will be a replacement.
When you say "stick a screw driver in it and it hit the side of the sink" don't you mean #8 which I assume runs all the way down to the part that has two supply line connections. I think I sort of did what you said when I was originally trying to tighten the new cartridge but it caused all of #8 to spin around so I stuck a block of wood between the protruding supply connection and the sink to hold it steady. That worked to tighten the cartridge, but now I am thinking I most likely will replace the whole faucet but can't get around the obstacle of being unable to turn #11.

Could you please clarify the part about gripping #11 and turn #10, seems to be opposite of what I was thinking.
Or if that is indeed what you mean, then it would be the last option as once I use vice grips or channel locks to grab onto the chrome top piece #10 then it will obviously destroy it. But, still I can't find a way to turn or grip #11.

Thanks and sorry for the long entries but trying to be clear what I'm challenged with.
 

Kreemoweet

In the Trades
Messages
754
Reaction score
66
Points
28
Location
Seattle. WA
The only reason to turn #11 is to set the proper height of the valve body #8 above the sink surface.
This is done by hand, no tools needed! (Notice that the instructions say "Hand Tighten"!). It is #10 that is turned to remove the valve from the sink. As has been said, you can immobilize #11 (if necessary) by just reaching under and holding it, or sticking something in the outlet hole and letting it jam up somewhere while you turn #10.
 
Last edited:

LDX

New Member
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
British Columbia
I think I am immobilizing #8 when I jam something between it and the sink correct?
#11 would still not likely turn along with #8????
But I do see what you mean by turning the top Chome ring #10 instead. Will try but I have a feeling it's far too slippery to grab unless I am 100% sure I am going to toss out the faucet and can grip it with a biting tool.

Interestingly, I have the same faucet in another bathroom and one of the handles is mounted a bit too loosely. If you keep pushing toward off then it will rotate a bit. So I could just turn the #10 plate tighter to make it grip the sink top more tightly?

Thanks again!
 

LDX

New Member
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
British Columbia
Thanks for all the support folks!
I took a closer look and it seemed like the faucet was salvagable. Replaced both cartridges and the T & Hose assembly.
When I looked at the rubber seal in the T it was all busted up. I wonder if these American Standard T seals are prone to failure because I have two more of these faucets in my other bathroom.

Decided to avoid a the extra work and save some dollars by keeping the faucet. Yikes, seems like faucets cost a lot more $ than when I purchased my last one a few years ago.

Thanks again everyone, very much appreciated.
 

psmith

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Santa Clara, CA
FYI - I agree with the original poster that you don't want to turn the escutcheon to loosen the valve body, as you may damage the escutcheon and/or the sink countertop. Rather, you want to loosen the locknut underneath. In essence you want to follow the installation instructions in reverse.
I am facing the same problem with an American Standard Amarilis faucet. If you download the original Amarilis installation instructions you will see they provided a special installation tool that can be used to tighten the locknut, even in a recessed location (I assume the same applied here). Note that a faucet socket won't work to loosen the locknut due to the exit outlet protruding from the side of the valve body. The best solution I have found (but have not tried yet) is to use needle nose locking pliers to grab the locknut, which should allow you to loosen it enough to then safely remove the escutcheon.
See the YouTube video here:
 

Kreemoweet

In the Trades
Messages
754
Reaction score
66
Points
28
Location
Seattle. WA
Basin wrench. Basin wrench. Basin wrench. It was mentioned above, but not emphasized enough. It is the standard tool for turning
nuts up underside of sinks (i.e. "basins"). They come in different designs, lengths, and sizes. Every service
plumber in the world has an assortment in his toolbox. Every handyperson needs one, too.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks