Hot Water Recirculator - Which Product for me?

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Maine Way

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Hello All,

I am looking for the right recirculation system for my home.

1. I will provide 1/2" return lines to kitchen and two remote bathroom groups, each with a tee to the hot water supply for each location (all currently homerunned) and with a check valve at each end point.
2. I plan to tee all three 1/2" return lines lines into a single 3/4" line at the boiler
3. I plan to have the recirculator connected to the 3/4" return, which will connect to the cold water supply to indirect tank.
4. I plan to install buttons at all three locations, which call for the recirc pump to activate.

The advantages of this arrangement is using only one pump, and having recirculation on command from point of use. There is an inefficiency in that it will heat hot water in all three lines, when only one is may be needed, however, it won't run on a timer, heating the lines when not needed at all.

Requirements:

1. 3/4" connections
2. ability to call from remote button (three button inputs - not sure if I connect all three to one set of contacts on the pump - probably yes, just completes circuit and sends a call)
3. bonus feature - the system knows when the water in the line is already hot, to avoid running the pump needlessly

There are a lot of products out there. I do believe that some that are intended for under cabinet install could be installed at the boiler. Also, many that are intended to use the cold water could be connected to a dedicated return instead - I think... After looking at many products, I am unsure what is best for my application. Any advise is appreciated.

Shawn
 

breplum

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I have had no complaints from customers where we used ACT D'Mand Kontrols.
They offer wireless and low v. wired remotes.
Three balancing valves for sure in your case.
 

Maine Way

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I have had no complaints from customers where we used ACT D'Mand Kontrols.
They offer wireless and low v. wired remotes.
Three balancing valves for sure in your case.
Hello breplm,

This looks like a sweet system! There may be some adjusting to install the pump near the boiler. The first issue I see is that the hot water sensor is factory installed at the pump. That works with under sink install. I would need a way to move the sensor to the tee under the the farthest sink in order to confirm hot water has reached the all fixtures, and run a long wire to that location to extend the signal circuit. Or, I could detect hot water in the return line near the boiler. That would be a bit more wasteful.

Shawn
 

jadnashua

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Since you are running new return lines, make sure to insulate them, and as much of the supply lines as possible, too.

At least a few ways to control the flow.
1. A sensor that shuts the pump off.
2. A thermostatic control valve that shuts the flow off and the pump can remain on, simplifying things, or you can then shut the pump off, too.

The second choice may speed things up, as the shorter loop's control would shut flow off there, increasing what's available elsewhere so that balancing becomes less critical.

If the lines are well insulated, having the system on a timer may not be that great of an energy waste and means no wait, which can become an annoyance, and a foreign concept to any visitors. You'll also more easily use a smaller pump. The pump in mine is only a 9W thing. The first time it runs when the timer closes in the morning, it might take two minutes to get the lines hot, but the rest of the day, it's essentially instant with no user inputs.
 

Maine Way

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Since you are running new return lines, make sure to insulate them, and as much of the supply lines as possible, too.

At least a few ways to control the flow.
1. A sensor that shuts the pump off.
2. A thermostatic control valve that shuts the flow off and the pump can remain on, simplifying things, or you can then shut the pump off, too.

The second choice may speed things up, as the shorter loop's control would shut flow off there, increasing what's available elsewhere so that balancing becomes less critical.

If the lines are well insulated, having the system on a timer may not be that great of an energy waste and means no wait, which can become an annoyance, and a foreign concept to any visitors. You'll also more easily use a smaller pump. The pump in mine is only a 9W thing. The first time it runs when the timer closes in the morning, it might take two minutes to get the lines hot, but the rest of the day, it's essentially instant with no user inputs.
Hello jadnashua,

Thanks for the ideas here. I had not considered these approaches. Also, I have access to about 50-60% of the lines and could insulate them...that will help.

Shawn
 
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