Disable Jet pump when tank is low?

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s10010001

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I'm looking for ideas on how to setup something to disable my jet/booster pump if the water level in my tank is nearing the bottom.

Something simple, mechanical. I'm not interested in any fancy control boxes or anything. If it's not simple Id rather bother.

Thanks!
 

WorthFlorida

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Google "float switches for water tanks". Just can't get simpler. If the booster pump is a 120v plug in, then using a Tether Float Switch will work. But if it is a pressure tank then it gets a more complicated. You'll need a pressure switch set below 28 PSI or less that has normally closed contacts which may not exist. Then you need to build a control box with some relays to make it work.

However, this looks like it might work but it works on low pressure, not water level. If the pressure tank gets low on water the pressure will drop but doubleful it will not be down to 3 PSI. Keep searching on "low pressure switch".

https://www.freshwatersystems.com/p...WR2XQsKtSzfBoSLCBeWxXwZxnkSNJQohoCcFoQAvD_BwE
 

Reach4

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How many amps is the pump, and is it 240 or 120?

As I understand it you can switch a single hot on a 240, as long as there is a disconnect to remove both hots.

The float switch would be called a "pump down" or "normally open" or "close on rise" type -- the type that would normally be used to control a sump pump or sewage pump.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-...-or-Open-Tank-Applications-9036DG2R/206398811 is another kind of float switch. You need to add a rod and a float that lifts up to close the 2-pole contacts. It's like a pressure switch, but is controlled by the lifting or dropping of the arm by a float.
 
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Valveman

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If this is a 230V pump you can use a Cycle Sensor to protect the pump from running dry and not have to install anything in the tank. The Cycle sensor just senses amps and knows when the pump has run dry.

 

s10010001

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Yea its 230v. I was thinking there had to be a simple mechanical solution. The Cycle Sensor looks perfect just more money the I wanted to spend for an unlikely scenario TBH.

I was thinking something similar to my underground pumps flat switch but backwards.. but now the I Think about it, there's an expensive condoler on that too, a PumpTech with the witching function. IDK maybe I could make a 230v relay.

I guess I'll start working up the nerve to spend $300 on the Cycle Sensor at some point.
 
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Reach4

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Curious, would a 40-60 pressure switch with low pressure cut off do what I'm looking for?
I am not sure. Sounds like a really cheap solution, and a lot of people have them. Sounds like a reasonable risk, and probably would work as you want.

Note that when you have such a switch, you want to make sure your air precharge is not too high. If you get a false trip, lower the air precharge a bit. Maybe start with 5 psi below cut-in pressure.
 
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