Danze Pullout Faucet

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LLigetfa

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When building our home in '98/'99 the wife chose a Danze Plymouth Pullout faucet for our mudroom sink. By 2020, it was looking tired and so I asked he wife to go choose a replacement. She chose an identical Danze Plymouth. The unit leaked at the ball stem on day one. I was able to tighten the retainer nut to stop the leak but that was short-lived. After a few more adjustments, I finally contacted Danze for an A66D641N ball valve assembly and they were quick to send it out.

Unfortunately, I should have tried taking off the canopy (cap) before ordering the ball valve assembly as the threads had corroded from the leaking water and I ended up marring the cap with slip-joint pliers. The chrome thread on the cap had galled and I ended up having to work it back and forth, tightening and loosening before it would come off. Danze was good about also sending out more parts.

Also, when I turned the angle stops back on, the hot side leaked at the stem so it looks like I will be changing those out as well. SO much for not following my own advice to always have spare angle stops on hand.
 

LLigetfa

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Sometimes I feel like the despair.com Mistakes poster.

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LLigetfa

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Also, when I turned the angle stops back on, the hot side leaked at the stem so it looks like I will be changing those out as well.
I picked up a newer style quarter turn angle stop. When I removed the old angle stop, the pipe stub was too short to slide the nut back far enough to expose the ferrule to be able to cut it off. I tried reusing the old nut and ferrule on the new stop but that did not work as the new stop has a shallower end for the stub so the ferrule was too far back.

I ended up having to cut a short piece of pipe to shove into the old stop so that when I tightened the nut, it pulled the ferrule closer to the end. I then had to cut a slightly longer piece of pipe to shove into the end to pull the ferrule some more. Then I was able to stack both short pieces to pull the ferrule all the way to the end where I could then get at it with a file to split it and remove it.

The take-away lesson is to always stub the pipe out far enough so that the nut can be pushed back far enough to expose the ferrule.
 

John Gayewski

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I picked up a newer style quarter turn angle stop. When I removed the old angle stop, the pipe stub was too short to slide the nut back far enough to expose the ferrule to be able to cut it off. I tried reusing the old nut and ferrule on the new stop but that did not work as the new stop has a shallower end for the stub so the ferrule was too far back.

I ended up having to cut a short piece of pipe to shove into the old stop so that when I tightened the nut, it pulled the ferrule closer to the end. I then had to cut a slightly longer piece of pipe to shove into the end to pull the ferrule some more. Then I was able to stack both short pieces to pull the ferrule all the way to the end where I could then get at it with a file to split it and remove it.

The take-away lesson is to always stub the pipe out far enough so that the nut can be pushed back far enough to expose the ferrule.
You couldn't cut some of the pipe off so the valve would seat onto ferrule? I just had this issue, but with plastic pipe and I cut the pipe just after the ferrule and it worked fine. I left enough pipe to go down into the new joint but there was too much to begin with.
 

Terry

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Hardware stores carry sleeve pullers. A really good tool to have handy if you're changing shutoffs at the wall for faucets.
They will slide off the back nut and the sleeve with it.

Or you can take a hack saw and shorten up the copper pipe that's preventing the new stop from fitting tight enough to the sleeve.

pasco-sleeve-puller-terrylove-01.jpg
sleeve_puller_1.jpg
 
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LLigetfa

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Hardware stores carry sleeve pullers. A really good tool to have handy if you're changing shutoffs at the wall for faucets.
They will slide off the back nut and the sleeve with it.
I didn't know they made one that would fit behind the nut and pull both the nut and the ferrule in one shot. I've only seen ones that just pull the ferrule but then you need room to slide the nut back. I've also seen ones that split the ferrule but again the nut was in the way.

It was too cramped under the sink to use a hacksaw. There was not enough of the stub sticking out for my mini pipe cutter to work. I can't remember where I left my Dremel tool or I would have used it to split the nut in two.
 

LLigetfa

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An angle grinder does the trick sometimes
I was eyeing up my angle grinder but the space under the sink is too tight. I have wash machine hookups under there as well.

I would have split the nut if I had a large enough nut splitter tool. The Saf-T-Kut tool looks like it might open wide enough to split the nut but not sure if it is strong enough.
 
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