Cold Kitchen Solutions- Run more duct work?

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MiracleSeeker

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Problem: Kitchen is very cold in the winter

Background: The house is built on a slab. The HVAC system is located on the first floor. The kitchen is adjacent to the HVAC system on the 1st floor. The duct work runs in a soffit across the top of the wall on one side of the kitchen. There are three vents along the 22" soffit. I am renovating the kitchen so cabinets will be moving

Potential Solution: Push out cabinet wall and run duct work down the wall and under the cabinets with vents on the toe kick.

Pros/Cons/Alternatives?
 

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WorthFlorida

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If it is cold because of lack on insulation and the long wall is an exterior wall, use spray foam for the best R valve. However bumping the wall out will allow for more insulation.

A good fabricator can run duct under all the cabinets and use the toe kick. That will get rid of the soffit assuming no other mechanicals, allow for taller wall cabinets and not lose floor space. The CON is all cabinets would need the side panels channelled out for the duct work and the cross section of the duct may not be able to provide enough air movement fro three outlets. If you have central air conditioning, summer time the kitchen may be warmer, cool floors but warm ceiling.

Another solution is electric heater(s) under the cabinet. If it is only needed for the very cold days, electric bill shouldn't hurt that much.
 

breplum

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The heating load of the space and the actual size of the duct system is all connected.
We use load calculations to size equipment and ducts. When properly done, comfort is great, though heat ducts in a ceiling are going to affect things as well.
You could have a improperly sized trunk duct, or lack of dampers at each register, hindering delivery evenly. Do you have balanced airflow at each grille?
Warm air at the toe kicks will be nicer if there is proper airflow.
 

John Gayewski

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I would say heated mat under a new tile floor, but depending on how cold it gets where you are the ground could suck most of the heat away from you.

Better to stay with warm air if that's what you got, but it is even better for the registeres to be around ground level.
 
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