Best course of action (bathroom sink)

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by gwalt, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. gwalt

    gwalt New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2010
    Location:
    Southeast
    I have the issue depicted in the attached images. The metal (chrome?) pipe seen entering the wall has rusted approximately 3/4". The pipe extends roughly 2" out of the wall. Until a few minutes ago there was a PVC coupler covered with plumbers putty that joined the 2 pipes. My concern is that this wasn't the correct solution in the first place so I am seeking the assistance of generous folks like you all.

    I am toying with the idea of cutting back to get clean pipe and using a longer coupler for the 1 1/4" drain pipes. If the PVC coupler is the correct solution.

    Or calling a plumber to open up the wall in the next room and take this drain pipe through the floor into the crawl space and over to an existing PVC drain for the shower.

    My house was built in 1920 and has mostly been retro-fitted with PVC and copper. However the toilet and sink in this bathroom look to be connected to the remaining 4" (?) galvanized toilet drain.

    Just looking for a little suggestions. I am capable but I'm not too foolish enough to attempt to far exceed my abilities (after all a little exceeding is how you learn right?!?).

    Thanks in advance for your time and typing!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Sep 2, 2004
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    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
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    New England
    Break the paint film between the pipe sticking out and the pipe, then try to pull off the eschution. If you are lucky, there's a nut you can loosen, and that piece of pipe will pull out and you can then replace the whole run. Once it gets to that point, I think you're better off replacing the drain line as far as you can get. Take a picture of what's there after you take that eschution off.
     
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  4. Basement_Lurker

    Basement_Lurker One who lurks

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    Even with the escutcheon plate left on, you still have plenty to work with once you carefully saw off that corroded section of tubing. Just get yourself a shielded rubber transition coupling and you will fine.
     
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    It looks to me that the bottom of that pipe stub is corroded away about an inch or more in from the end. The rest of it probably isn't in much better shape. Dig in a little further and see.
     
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    How I would do it, and how you can are probably two very different things, since I have done hundreds of them. I would remove that stub and then remove the "solder bushing" that it went into and which is screwed into the pipe in the wall. Then I would install a brass "trap adapter", using the better option depending on far back into the wall it is, then slide the trap into it and tighten the slip joint nut.
     
  7. gwalt

    gwalt New Member

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    Nov 2, 2010
    Location:
    Southeast
    Luckily I have a second bath to use. (much to my wife's chagrin) Since posting I've found the pipe rusted well into the wall, all the way to the elbow. I attempted to unscrew the chrome plated brass pipe (?) from the eblow in the wall. The eblow makes a 90 to the right and heads toward the toilet. That section of what looks to be steel pipe is in great shape. I had to open a small inspection hole in the plaster wall in the closet behind the bathroom to get access to the pipe. I found an unbelievable number of razor blades inside the wall. I believe my best/easiest course would be to remove the eblow and replace it. My logic is that I can get a wrench on sewer side of the elbow a lot easier than the bathroom side. Any thoughts?
     
  8. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    New England
    You really need two wrenches...one to hold the pipe that is staying, and one to turn the fitting off of it. Otherwise, you might start disassembling thing further in the wall than you want.
     
  9. Manicmechanic

    Manicmechanic New Member

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    Dec 11, 2009
    Location:
    Midwest
    I always wondered where they went, older medicine cabinets used to have a slot in them that said "put used blades here" and thus they would fall down inside the wall.
     
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    Occupation:
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    Location:
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    That is usually the HARDEST way to do it, assuming you even have enough space in the wall for the elbow to rotate. You also may NOT have the big wrench you need to unscrew it. You may still be further ahead to call a plumber to remove it WITHOUT opening the wall or causing any other problems.
     
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