1st Time Bathroom Remodel - Advice on Sink/Toilet plumbing connections?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by 1stTimeHomeOwner, Mar 21, 2020.

  1. 1stTimeHomeOwner

    1stTimeHomeOwner New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2020
    Location:
    Denver
    Hello! I'm happy to have found this forum. It has been quite the experience with my first bathroom remodel (learned about tile, drywall, electrical, plumbing/sewer line, etc...). So far, we have been really happy with the results.

    I'm hoping someone can point in the right direction with the plumbing connections on my bathroom remodel. Note: The house is an older 1953 house... Please reference the pics below of the current setup.

    Bathroom Sink Water Supplies and Drain (I removed the drywall to attach additional stud support for the wall mount vanity)

    first-timer-1.jpg

    Close-up of Sink Water Supply connections

    first-timer-2.jpg first-timer-3.jpg

    Toilet Water Supply

    first-timer-4.jpg

    It's worth pointing out that the bathroom was rarely used due to low pressure of the faucet and toilet valve. We found the cause for the low pressure was the fixtures (bad sink faucet and bad valve in the old toilet tank - not a line issue). We are replacing everything with new parts. The water did come out brown which I believe might be tied to the galvanized nipples/valves, etc.. so any advice on replacement options is appreciated.

    What is recommended to clean this all up? I'm not sure if this is DIY, or if I should hire a plumber to assist with this part. Plumbing is a bit intimidating to me, but I have enjoyed learned and I'm willing to attempt it unless its too much for a first timer. Thank you for any help!
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2020
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    I would cut out the santee there and replace it with a new one. You can use Mission couplings for that. They come in various sizes to match the pipes. Plastic pipes will be different sizing than the cast.

    I would get rid of the galvanized and stub out copper pipe, and then use compression shutoffs after drywall. The way you won't need to solder at trim.
     
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  4. 1stTimeHomeOwner

    1stTimeHomeOwner New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2020
    Location:
    Denver
    Thanks for the info! I will remove the santee and replace it with a new one.
    Should the 3/8 galvanized simply be unscrewed from the elbows and replaced with same size 3/8 copper with a threaded connection? I will be sure the connection coming out will allow for a compression shut-off.

    Does anything special need to be done with the toilet supply line? I can't tell the type of metal that the nipple is.
    Thanks,
     
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Anytime I install a toilet, I replace the braided connector. If you have copper at the wall, you can use a compression stop as a replacement. I can't tell from the picture if it's copper, it may be.

    Are the pipe nipples at the lav 3/8"? You might consider picking up brass nipples in that size then and using IP stops after drywall.
     
  6. 1stTimeHomeOwner

    1stTimeHomeOwner New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2020
    Location:
    Denver
    The nipple connection at the toilet supply line has a threaded connection to the shut-off valve. I'm planning on replacing the braided connection as well as the valve. I will try to clean the nipple up to see what it's made of.
    As far as the sink connections, the galvanized pipe nipples are 3/8 (threaded on both sides to elbow and plug). It sounds like Brass might be the easiest thing to do. I just hope I don't run into any issues unscrewing them from the elbow (hard to tell what kind of metal the elbow is).
    Last question, what are "IP stops"?

    I appreciate the help. Look forward to getting this going. I will order everything later today.
     
  7. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Iron Pipe threads
    The elbows in the wall are brass. Hold those with pliers and with a pipe wrench or a second set of pliers unthread. You have to "back" the fitting.
     
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