Wiring New GE Electric Cooktop

Users who are viewing this thread

Chuck B

sea-bee
Messages
121
Reaction score
1
Points
18
Location
levering, michigan
Hi Guys,

I am replacing my free standing range/oven which was wired on a 50-amp circuit with 6-gauge 4-wire. The breaker was 50-amps.

I would have a very difficult time feeding an 8-gauge wire to the new cooktop. I will install a 40-amp breaker in the panel as that is what’s required for the cooktop. Of course all power will be off at the main for the wiring project.

My questions are this:

I have always understood that going bigger with the wire is not a problem and safe. So can I use the 4-lead, 6-gauge wire with a 40 amp breaker for the cooktop?

The range/oven was wired with a 4-wire configuration. A black, red, white, and a bare ground.

However the GE cooktop was prewired with a flexible conduit whip with just two wires plus a bare ground.

Do I connect the two non-ground wires leading from the cooktop to the same color wires from the panel in the electrical box near the cooktop, formerly used by the range, and connect the grounds together, then cap off the third unneeded wire in the box and also in the electrical panel?

The range/oven circuit wire of course was connected to a range cord plug, But that would not be used for the cooktop connection. Just a plate with a flexible cable connector.

I am presuming that the two wires that are connected to the cooktop are attached to the 40 amp breaker, and the bare ground wire to the grounding lug in the panel. I would cap off the third wire that is not being used in the panel out of the way just as I would do in the electrical box near the cooktop.

Or do I use the white wire as a ground and not use the bare ground and attach the white wire to the grounding lug in the panel, capping off the bare ground wires instead.

i’ve tried to explain the situation as clearly as I could. However if you need any more information please respond. Thank you very much!

PS I know this is not an electrical question but should the cooktop be set on a bead of caulk? And if so what kind do you suggest, silicone, etc? There are also screw on connectors that come with the cooktop.
 
Last edited:

Stuff

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,214
Reaction score
128
Points
63
Location
Pennsylvania
No oven?
Yes, connect like colored wires in the box and ground-to-ground. Cap off the white wire at the box if not used, do NOT use it as ground. Leave it connected to the neutral bar at the panel.
 

Chuck B

sea-bee
Messages
121
Reaction score
1
Points
18
Location
levering, michigan
No oven?
Yes, connect like colored wires in the box and ground-to-ground. Cap off the white wire at the box if not used, do NOT use it as ground. Leave it connected to the neutral bar at the panel.


Thanks for the information.

I’m curious why you suggest I keep the white wire attached to the neutral bar in the panel instead of simply capping it off there, since it goes to the box by the cooktop and is capped there and not used? What purpose would it serve being attached to the neutral bar and going nowhere?

This work is done at a small 700 square-foot cottage in northern Michigan and we have a built-in “convection” microwave above the cooktop which will serve as an oven when needed. It’s a space saving measure as we’ll use the cabinet under the cooktop for pots and pans storage.

You did not specify that the 6-gauge wire is not a problem as an 8-gauge wire is normally used with 40 amp circuits. Please confirm.

thanks for your time and efforts.
 

wwhitney

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,050
Reaction score
1,262
Points
113
Location
Berkeley, CA
I’m curious why you suggest I keep the white wire attached to the neutral bar in the panel instead of simply capping it off there, since it goes to the box by the cooktop and is capped there and not used? What purpose would it serve being attached to the neutral bar and going nowhere?
No purpose, but disconnecting it at the panel has no upside. Leaving it connected is simpler for you and simpler for the next person who wants to use that box for a 120V/240V circuit. Either way is fine.

Make sure you get a torque screwdriver for making up your screw-based electrical connections.

No problem using #6 copper on a 40 amp breaker if the breaker is rated to take #6. It should be, but you need to double check. It should say in embossed print on the breaker case.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Stuff

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,214
Reaction score
128
Points
63
Location
Pennsylvania
Disconnecting the white neutral in the panel and putting a wire nut on it just wastes space and adds to the mess.

NEC had some weird rules and used to require all upsized wires to upsize the ground proportionately. So if you used #6 for where a #8 would do you had to make your ground a #8 from #10. They changed it so only if you are required to upsize the wires are you required to upsize the ground.

Depending on what's going on there is a special tap rule for 50 amp circuits serving a oven and stovetop. Doesn't sound like you need to consider it though.
 

jadnashua

Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx
Messages
32,654
Reaction score
1,143
Points
113
Location
New England
When used in a 120vac circuit, the neutral does carry current...so while it's not connected at your cooktop, it's good to connect it to the neutral bus so, in case it ever touches something it shouldn't, the breaker will trip.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks