Why is "too powerful" sump pump is bad?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by JoeA, Jun 30, 2020.

  1. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    General question... I'm currently using Ridgid 1/2hp and thinking about switching to Libery Pumps 3/4 just to be on the safe side. 1/2hp does the job but RidGid GPH is also slightly higher than Liberty 1/2 GPH (at least according to Ridgid).
     
  2. WorthFlorida

    WorthFlorida The wife is still training me.

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    If your pumping needs is not continuous and generally not needed for sump pumps, stay with the 1/2 hp. Nothing is gained and the pump will short cycle more often with 3/4 hp. If you had a very high lift where a 1/2 hp was working hard, then a 3/4 hp would be warrantied or the water flow into the sump pit exceeded the capacity of the pump. If anything, you should look into a separate battery backup pump if you do not have one.
     
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  4. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    My pump is working very hard during heavy rains here and I decided to switch to floatless option with a non-automatic pump. Yesterday we had a mid-size rain here and I measuring it running every 30 seconds. The idea it to take more than a few inches of water every time. Theoretically I could stick with 1/2 but if 3/4 would take more water faster and it would provide larger interval between cycles?
     
  5. WorthFlorida

    WorthFlorida The wife is still training me.

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    To get less cycles and a longer time between pump cycles you need a larger pit.
     
  6. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

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    Your 1/2 HP is obviously pumping out water faster than water is entering the pit otherwise, the pump would not shutoff. As the water flow rate entering the pit is likely fairly consistent, a faster flowing pump will only reduce the pump run time but will not decrease the pump run frequency. Short, frequent run times will be harder on a pump vs a pump running nonstop.

    Instead of replacing the pump or enlarging the pit, are exterior modifications possible to direct water away from the home's foundation to reduce the amount of water that is entering the pit? If less water flows into the pit, less water will need to be pumped out.
     
  7. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    I know somebody who put mulch around the foundation for that purpose.

    A larger pit would do it, but setting the cut-in level higher can do that too. Having the pump turn on when your foundation perimeter drain pipe is half full can effectively increase the capacity for free.

    The downside would be that there is less time to get the generator going if your electricity goes out.
     
  8. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

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    Not sure that mulch would reduce the quantity of water penetration around the foundation since mulch is typically water permeable.

    Downspout discharge distances from the foundation and soil grading will largely influence the amount of water that will enter a sump pit. The farther each directs water away from the home's foundation, will typically result in less water entering the sump pit.
     
  9. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    No really, there is large area behind my house and it kind of lower than other houses :-(
     
  10. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    My idea is to use LevelGuard or HydroCheck Hi-Lo Pump Controller with non-automatic pump so I can take out around 10"-12" of water at a time. Thats the reason why I thought more powerfull pump would be better. Larger pit is an option but too costly and I don't believe I can do it by myself due to medical conditions.
     
  11. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Glad you have re-thought it.
     
  12. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

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    That does not signify the grading around your home is directing surface water away to that area. Perhaps there maybe a slight grading rise between your home and the lower area which maybe preventing water from flowing away freely.

    How high does the water remain above the pump intake when the pump shuts-off?
     
  13. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    I live in a homeowners association and there is very little I can do outside of my property. I added a gutter drain pipe in the lowest area of the house but I remember a few times when water was even higher than foundation here so it came in between sidings and the foundation. Illinois has terrible weather
    Probably an inch or so
     
  14. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    It would be more important to try get that slope away from the foundation on the higher side of the house -- where the house is interrupting the flow.
     
  15. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    I wish I could, it's right behind the air conditioning unit and comed box :-/
     
  16. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

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    The water in the pit cannot be reduced much further. To allow 10"-12" to be removed per pump cycle, would seem to imply you intend for the water level to rise within the pit higher than it does now.

    Since increasing the water height in the pit will usually also allow the water below the foundation footings and basement floor to also increase the same amount, will increased water height have a negative effect on the structure or result in excessive dampness through the basement floor?
     
  17. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    The main pump is currently runs at yellow mark and sits on two bricks at the bottom. I'm thinking about replacing the bricks with something lower and pump water from red mark. I definitely not going to get 10" out of water but maybe 8". The reason behind floatless option is that according to Zoeller and Liberty Pumps it would decrease the chance of mechanical switch failure. Yesterday my pump cycled every 40 seconds :-/
     

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    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
  18. JoeA

    JoeA New Member

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    This is very valid point I didn't think about!
     
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