When to replace carbon media for whole house system?

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Reader90

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Hello,

Did some searching here, but could not find. See articles about resin media replacement intervals based on type of water (city or well), cross link % and if softener has a whole home carbon filter in front of softener, which I do. I have a 2 cu ft tank, 2 actually, for softening and other carbon filter, using coconut carbon media. I am on city water that uses chlorine. Both systems were installed 9/2017, i.e. two Pentair 5810 valves for each tank, non-vortex tanks

Questions:

1. What is the time frame I should replace the carbon media with new carbon media?

2. Type of carbon -- should I stay with coconut carbon media from an OEM like Jacobi?

3. Particle size of carbon should I use?

4. Other things to consider?

Thanks in advance!!
 

ditttohead

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1. What is the time frame I should replace the carbon media with new carbon media? typical is 5 years, up to 10 is not unheard of.

2. Type of carbon -- should I stay with coconut carbon media from an OEM like Jacobi? Use high end like Jacobi or comparable.

3. Particle size of carbon should I use? Typical is 12x40, finer may cause flow restrictions, coarser may not be as effective.

4. Other things to consider? Catalytic is definitely worth upgrading to.
 

Reach4

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Consider measuring the residual chlorine.
Maybe Lamotte 2979, looks useful.
https://www.zoro.com/lamotte-test-strip-chlorine-0-to-5-ppm-pk50-2979/i/G1064262/


There are other offerings. To put numbers in perspective, water at your house would normally have 0.5 to 4.0 ppm of chlorine I think. https://www.cdc.gov/safewater/chlorine-residual-testing.html That link also talks of pool test kits and color wheel tests.

If your system uses chloromine, you would use a total chlorine test.

I am not sure where I would draw the line for how much residual chlorine would indicate that new carbon was needed. Testing raw water and post-carbon water should give significantly different results.
 

Bannerman

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Carbon is the preferred media to remove numerous contaminates and chemicals while also improving water color, odor and taste.

While chlorine will be easily and rapidly removed even at high flow rates, other contaminates often require considerably longer contact time with the media for removal to occur. Testing for chlorine residual after a carbon filter is not a reliable method to determine when to replace the media as chlorine will usually continue to be effectively removed long after the carbon's capacity to remove other contaminates has been exceeded.

Because carbon will remove chlorine as a disinfectant, recommend to temporarily bypass the carbon system yearly and allow chlorinated water to flow to each cold water faucet and appliance within the home. Permitting the chlorinated water to remain within the plumbing lines for a few hours should be sufficient to sanitize the plumbing lines and faucets before resuming flow through the carbon system and flushing the chlorinated water from the plumbing system.

To sanitize the water heater and piping, increase the water temperature to maintain 150+ for 2-3 hours before allowing the extra hot water to flow to each fixture. To reduce the potential for scalding, this proceedure could be performed while other family members are absent.
 
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