Water Softener Drainage Pump

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Nin28

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The house that I own had a Culligan water softener previously installed. There is a 1/2 in flexible tube hanging next to where it used to be that runs along the ceiling and into our home's drainage. I would like to re-use this for a new water softener and I'm guessing that it was once attached to a water pump of some sort. Can't seem to find any pump specific for water softener use on Home Depot website. Any suggestions?
 

Bannerman

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Water softeners utilize water pressure to perform each regeneration procedure. Each regeneration procedure excluding Brine Fill, will result in water flow to drain. For drain water to flow some distance upward to drain, does not require a pump, but the vertical distance will be largely determined by incoming water pressure.

To ensure the required flow rate to drain, when the water treatment device's drain line distance exceeds 15' horizontally, or when routed above the softener, the usual recommendation will be to increase the drain line diameter (ie: use 3/4" for a softener equipped with a 1/2" drain connection).

Because a water softener processes potable water, the softener's drain line is not to be connected directly to the home's drainage system, but is to be discharged through an air gap device to ensure no contaminated discharge can contact the softener drain line and backflow into the softener if there ever is a sewer backup.

Image below shows a softener's drain line connected to an airgap device installed above the P-trap.

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Nin28

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Bannerman,

Thanks for the information and the pic. In looking at the image, it is pretty much exactly the config I have so it is going directly into the sewage line instead of the home drainage as I stated. I also measured and it will have about 3 ft rise to the from the softener to ceiling and then a 10 ft run to the p-trap, so I'm think I'm good with that. Worse case scenario I can always increase the diameter of the drainage pipe but I doubt that will be necessary as what is already in place most likely worked. Thanks again!
 

Reach4

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That photo shows a standpipe trap with no vent. So I hope yours is not pretty much exactly the configuration you have.
 

Jeff H Young

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photo is a poor example on how to install the drain beyond the airgap (p trap unvented trap arm offset ) otherwise good info

oops forgot to send sorry but the image bannerman sent is a good example for part of the installation is a poor example on how a stand pipe is plumbed and vented
 

Bannerman

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That was the only image I could locate, showing an airgap device utilized for a softener drain which was discharged above the height of the softener, but below the floor deck of the level above.
 

Reach4

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has a couple of sketches.
 

Nin28

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Well it's EXACTLY like that, but it is connected right into the sewage like. I'll take a pic tomorrow and see what you think.
 
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