Water pressure switch/tank HELPPPP

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog. Water is life.' started by tskstorm, Jul 29, 2019.

  1. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2019
    Location:
    Poconos


    This keeps happening, the water will run, then stop, then start again .. this is what happens on the pressure gauge. I am by no means a plumber, but pretty handy, Switch was just replaced, No other info on pump/well but there is always water, so I think it might be a tank issue ? tank has 38 psi air when empty, switch is 40/60.
     
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    If your pressure switch does not have a lever, it would seem to be a pump issue. Is there power going to the pump after the gauge falls to zero?

    From when the pump stops until it starts again, how much time goes by?
     
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  4. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

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    Jul 29, 2019
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    There is no lever on the pressure switch, switch is brand new. Frankly I do not know where the pump is, as you can see I have limited access, this system is in a closet the size of a High school Locker. There is Power at all terminals at the pressure switch at all times. 30 seconds to 1 minute from the time it gets to 0 till water starts again.
     
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    On the pressure switch, is there 240 volts between terminal 1 and 4 at all times?
    Is there 240 volts between terminal 2 and 3 at all times?

    I presume the pump is in the well.

    Start asking your neighbors who is a good well guy.
     
  6. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

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    Jul 29, 2019
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    1 and 3 has 240, 2 and 4 has 0 (current pressure gauge reads 60) 1 and 4 has 110, and 2 and 3 also has 110.
     
  7. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

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    Just to confirm, if you hold the red probe on 1 and the black probe on 3, you get 240?

    If you hold the red probe on 2 and the black probe on 3, you get 110?

    If you hold the red probe on 2 and the black probe on 4, you get 0?

    Is that what you are saying?

    That would imply that the lines from the breaker are wired between 1 and 3. The pump is wired on 2 and 4. So when you are checking the voltage to the pump, check between 2 and 4.

    When the pressure drops to zero as it did in your video, what is the voltage 2--4?
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2019
  8. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

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    That is correct.
     
  9. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2019
    Location:
    Poconos

    I have changed nothing since our last reply, but I can not get the gauge to drop to 0, currently it is working like it should. cutting in and out at 40/60.


    I will be back if it doesn't continue to work!
     
  10. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

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    Mar 15, 2006
    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    The cutting in and out at 40 and 60 is called cycling, and will cause your pump to start tripping an overload. These overloads in motor take 30-60 seconds to cool down and reset. If it is tripping the overload you need to be saving money quickly for a new pump.
     
  11. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

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    Jul 29, 2019
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    Maybe I used the wrong term, currently can fill my bathtub/take a shower without the water flow stopping, like it previously was. The pressure gauge starts at 60 psi, when it gets down to 40psi, it steadily goes back up to 60, stays there for a few moments, and then repeats ?
     
  12. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

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    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    That is called cycling. The pump is still cycling between 40 and 60 while you are filling the tub or taking a shower, which will cause it to trip the overload and the water will stop as you have seen. Once it starts tripping the overload the motor is on borrowed time.
     
  13. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

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    Jul 29, 2019
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    Poconos
    Thanks, what should it be doing ?
     
  14. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

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    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Pumps are made to run continuously. It is the cycling on and off that destroys them. It is best for the pump to stay on the entire time you are in the shower, filling a tub, or using water for anything longer term than flushing and washing hands.

     
  15. tskstorm

    tskstorm New Member

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    My take on this is it is working as designed, just not as efficiently as it could with a csv?
     
  16. valveman

    valveman Cary Austin Staff Member

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    Occupation:
    Pump Controls Technician
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    The design is to put only enough quality in pumps/motors to last an average of 7 years worth of cycling. The fewer times it cycles on and off the longer the pump system will last. If it is already tripping the overload occasionally, you have already used up just about all your cycles.
     
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