Water pressure issues

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Sammy

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Is a home that has been running at 80 psi for 8 years (regulated by the city) with no water pressure regulator and no boiler expansion tank, likely to have major issues or piping damage? Is the home most likely a money pit?

The home has a leaking irrigation system, non functional ice maker, 3 sinks leaking underneath near the piping, boiler corrosion, a toilet loose at the floor base, tubs draining slowly, and a leaking dishwasher.
 

Dj2

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Some of the things wrong with your house have nothing to do with water pressure.
But yes, a house could suffer from high water pressure.
City pressure in not constant, therefore you need a working regulator.
You take care of your body? your car? Then you must take care of your house too.
 

Sammy

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It’s a house that I’m interested in. I can’t believe they didn’t put a water pressure regulator on it, or at least an expansion tank on the boiler. I’m just trying to see what I’m getting myself into. If things are at least fixable. I’m mostly worried about pinhole leaks or pipes bursting. Maybe pipes that are worn down at an accelerated rate due to pressure.
 

Reach4

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Is a home that has been running at 80 psi for 8 years (regulated by the city) with no water pressure regulator and no boiler expansion tank, likely to have major issues or piping damage? Is the home most likely a money pit?

The home has a leaking irrigation system, non functional ice maker, 3 sinks leaking underneath near the piping, boiler corrosion, a toilet loose at the floor base, tubs draining slowly, and a leaking dishwasher.
I am not a pro. 80 psi is the top end of where they say home water pressure should be.

I would get a pressure gauge. Under $20, and often under $10. A garden hose thread pressure gauge can go on an outdoor spigot, a laundry tap, or the drain valve of a water heater. Check the pressure. Then check the pressure after a shower, when you use no other water such as toilet flushes, to see how much rise in pressure you get. If it stays under 90, I would not get a PRV. Even with 60 psi coming in, a house might need a thermal expansion tank. So see where the water pressure peaks.

You might even take a movie of the gauge as you take your hot shower. Review it an hour later, and fast forward to see the story.

How long the WH heats after a shower can vary with how powerful the WH is, and how warm the incoming water is.
 
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