Two dwellings on shared well, sudden loss of pressure.

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sjohnston

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Our home was built over our well. About 8-10 years ago a barn house was built right next door and connected to the same well. Everything has been fine until a few weeks ago when there was a sudden loss of pressure, (no water at all in both homes). Assumed it was the pressure switch which was changed and fine for a few days. Then it happened again. We bought a new submersible pump, water line, electrical wire, fittings, and pressure tank. Everything was fine for a few days then no pressure, again...shut off valve to neighbors water is in our basement. Had a professional come and take a look at everything and were told that our well isn't producing as much water anymore and that the water table is very low this winter. When water is shut off to the neighbors, we don't lose pressure but, we are very careful on how much water we use. Whenever we turn the water on to the neighbors, we seem to lose pressure completely at both homes, even if they just flush the toilet and take a quick shower. So does that mean our well isn't replenishing as fast anymore and it can no longer provide water for both homes? We're going to pull the pump Monday and see exactly how deep the well is to see if the pump can be lowered. Right now the pump is at 128feet. Just unsure why we don't lose pressure when the water is shut off to next door but when it's turned on and they use water we all lose pressure completely.
 

WorthFlorida

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Is there one or two pressure tanks? With both homes connected, does the pressure ever build up with every fixture turned off?
As you suspect, there is not enough water volume to push against all the plumbing. Pressure is applied to all fixtures by the pump, not just the pressure tank. One house and there is probably just enough water from the well to build pressure.

Just yesterday I came across an article that NYS, other than Buffalo, has a snow fall shortage. Not good for a run off this spring to replenish the well.
 
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Valveman

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Sounds like there is a leak on after the valve to the neighbors house. Even if the well is not producing much water, it will produce good water for a minute or two before the well pumps dry. After opening the valve to the neighbors, make sure they are not using water, turn off the pump and watch the gauge. If the pressure drops, there is a leak somewhere. Even a 1 GPM leak will waste 1440 gallons a day, which can cause the well to run dry. If there is no leak, lowering the pump if possible will help.

If the well is really gotten that bad, you may need a cistern storage tank and a booster pump to have the water needed for both houses.

LOW YIELD WELL_ CENTRIFUGAL_PK1A.jpg
 
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