Tub Drain & Overflow Styles

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Mathelo

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I have noticed that there are generally two styles of tub D&Os. The most common puts the p-trap under the overflow pipe and the less common has the p-trap directly under the drain. I've included two images to illustrate my words if they aren't clear.

p-trap under overflow pipe:
UnderOverflow.jpg

p-trap under drain pipe:
Under Drain.jpg

The latter seems to be more common in the UK.

Are there any clear advantages / disadvantages or code issues between these two styles?

Thanks!

Louis
 

Terry

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Plumbing Code is okay with either configeration.
They may not allow slip joints in concealed places though. Many of our installs now use solvent weld joints.
Either ABS or PVC

tub-drain-fittings-terrylove-01.jpg
 
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Mathelo

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They may not allow slip joints in concealed places though. Many of our installs now use solvent weld joints.
Either ABS or PVC

Are you saying this is more of an issue with one design or the other?

This is a remodel situation. I've stripped down to the studs and floor joists. Installing the D&O on the tub might be a challenge since I don't currently have access from below - would require ripping out some sheet rock, which I might do.

I plan to use PVC fittings. These pictures were just for illustration. I believe both designs are available in PVC.

Louis
 

Asktom

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Whichever setup is easiest is best. I would stay away from cable operated stoppers, you can count on them to fail.
 

hj

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The building consruction will determine which one fits, depending on the joist locations. The "toe outlet"/ second one requires a very precise trap location, while the heel outlet has more "adjustment' possibilities. There is a third option where the tee is on it back and the outlet is horizontal.
 

Mathelo

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The building consruction will determine which one fits, depending on the joist locations. The "toe outlet"/ second one requires a very precise trap location, while the heel outlet has more "adjustment' possibilities. There is a third option where the tee is on it back and the outlet is horizontal.

hj,

Thanks for the name, "toe outlet". Helps to get the nomenclature right. This is what I had before I ripped it all out but I can see that replacing with the same configuration could be harder without removing the sheet rock below, which I might do anyway because of some past water damage causing a bit of sag.

I don't believe my joists will be an issue for either type. They run the length of the tub.

Louis
 

hj

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If joists are NOT a problem, then there is absolutely NO reason to use the toe outlet, given that it is much more difficult to position the trap EXACTLY below the tub drain outlet.
 

Mathelo

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If joists are NOT a problem, then there is absolutely NO reason to use the toe outlet, given that it is much more difficult to position the trap EXACTLY below the tub drain outlet.

Perfect. Exactly what I needed to know.
 
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