This doesn't work! Laundry floor drain backing up.

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JohnDoe

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Hi all,

Having an issue with the floor drain backing up when the washer empties and sometimes the kitchen sink. Im in a 1950's ranch Ohio with slab and this is what I found in the wall. (House was someones quick flip) Been checking out the other forums and reading suggestions but need to finalize what to do.

1) I can see I'll need a p trap and vent for the standpipe? I can install that in the bay to the right and connect the vent into the upper section of the main vent not torn out yet.

2) Kitchen sink (behind the wall) does it needs a vent? What would that look like in this space?

3) Laundry sink?

4) If its easier I don't care about the standpipe. Could I just drain the washer into the sink unless some code prevents that.

Appreciate any help, Thanks, J

Plumbing.jpg
 
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It appears your drain line is backing up due to a partial clog. The washing machine puts out too much water too fast and the water can't get past the partial clog fast enough and it backs up in the (lower level) floor drain. Run a snake down the floor drain to get to the clog or go down the washing machine drain line to avoid the p-trap in the floor drain. Your washing machine drain definitely needs a p-trap added. Keep a hose handy or the washing machine ready to drain to verify and flush the line when it unclogs.
 

JohnDoe

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It appears your drain line is backing up due to a partial clog. The washing machine puts out too much water too fast and the water can't get past the partial clog fast enough and it backs up in the (lower level) floor drain. Run a snake down the floor drain to get to the clog or go down the washing machine drain line to avoid the p-trap in the floor drain. Your washing machine drain definitely needs a p-trap added. Keep a hose handy or the washing machine ready to drain to verify and flush the line when it unclogs.
I can snake it tomorrow and see what happens! Will report back
 

Reach4

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DIY snake may not be big enough, but it is worth a try.
 

John Gayewski

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The one problem code wise is a washer can't be vertically wet vented like that. I think the washer needs a 3x2 tee and needs to be on the bottom. Then the rest should be 3x2 tees also.

Basically the washer drain can't be a vent for the other two, but the other fixture's drains can be a vent for the washer as long as the vent/drain portion is one pipe size larger than the minimum. Hence the need for 3x2 tees.
 

JohnDoe

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Drain has been cleaned. Still getting an issue with a bubble of air and water pushing out the floor drain. Is it just due to the venting on the washer standpipe?

Thanks J
 

wwhitney

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4) If its easier I don't care about the standpipe. Could I just drain the washer into the sink unless some code prevents that.
So nothing is draining down from the top of the vertical stack in your picture?

If so, yes, you could eliminate the standpipe and drain the washer into your laundry sink. That will take care of the venting problem you have uncovered with the 3 stacked san-tees. Also the issue that the IPC requires that when the washer standpipe drain joins another drain, the combined drain needs to be 3". That doesn't apply in jurisdictions that adopt the IRC plumbing sections, but Ohio appears to have adopted the IPC for residential as well:


The fact you are still getting a backup suggests that you still have an obstruction downstream of the floor drain. Switching the washer to discharge into the laundry sink may mask the problem by reducing the flow rate. Although it won't affect the kitchen sink performance, which you also said occasionally backed up out of the floor drain.

Cheers, Wayne
 

wwhitney

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The one problem code wise is a washer can't be vertically wet vented like that. I think the washer needs a 3x2 tee and needs to be on the bottom. Then the rest should be 3x2 tees also.

Basically the washer drain can't be a vent for the other two, but the other fixture's drains can be a vent for the washer as long as the vent/drain portion is one pipe size larger than the minimum. Hence the need for 3x2 tees.
The above would be correct for the UPC. In the IPC any two fixtures can share a common vent, so basically you can vertically wet vent any one fixture. The venting issue in the OP is that there is a 3rd fixture below, which the IPC does not allow. Also that the washing machine is on top, it would have to be the wet vented fixture.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Reach4

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power rented a machine
1. Do you think you rodded to the city sewer?

2. Is there a basement under this?

3.What is the deal with that floor drain? It does not look like a regular floor drain. No bowl.
 

Jeff H Young

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drain still not open , clogged, cement or something , open pipes drain clogged pipes dont .
 

JohnDoe

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1. Do you think you rodded to the city sewer?

2. Is there a basement under this?

3.What is the deal with that floor drain? It does not look like a regular floor drain. No bowl.
1) I think I went far enough I'm going to find the clean out outside the septic and try from that side. Will report back

2) I'm on a slab

3) I don't know the layout of the house main sewer.. down the hall are two more baths. I can see and feel the P trap on the laundry floor drain. That is where I get a bubble of air and water pushing out.

The sewer line inside goes about 30 foot to a small septic tank that has a pump up to the street sewer. The tank pump and line to the the street is all brand new.
 

Reach4

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Had your septic pumped lately? It is a lot cheaper to do that early than late.
 

jadnashua

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How old is the septic system? A septic tank is normally full of water and waste, and when you add some new, it pushes the (hopefully) particle free, clearer water out the top into the leach field(s). If the leach fields get clogged, it could be a bigger issue, and your pipes may be fine...it may be just that the leach fields cannot accept the waste water fast enough (IOW, all of the space in the soil is plugged up), and only perks at a slower rate. Ideally, shortly after you add anything to the septic system, all of the overflow would have leached out into the soil. This can be a problem if you have a particularly wet season, and the soil is saturated...there's no place for the water to leach to in the field. Standing water or very soft ground over your leach lines is a big red flag.

FWIW, not pumping out a septic tank in a timely fashion can be the death of a leach field, requiring replacement. As the solids accumulate, eventually, there's not enough space for the debris to fall out, so lots of particles get pushed out into the leach field and plug up the spaces between the soil particles, slowing or maybe even stopping absorption.
 

Jeff H Young

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How old is the septic system? A septic tank is normally full of water and waste, and when you add some new, it pushes the (hopefully) particle free, clearer water out the top into the leach field(s). If the leach fields get clogged, it could be a bigger issue, and your pipes may be fine...it may be just that the leach fields cannot accept the waste water fast enough (IOW, all of the space in the soil is plugged up), and only perks at a slower rate. Ideally, shortly after you add anything to the septic system, all of the overflow would have leached out into the soil. This can be a problem if you have a particularly wet season, and the soil is saturated...there's no place for the water to leach to in the field. Standing water or very soft ground over your leach lines is a big red flag.

FWIW, not pumping out a septic tank in a timely fashion can be the death of a leach field, requiring replacement. As the solids accumulate, eventually, there's not enough space for the debris to fall out, so lots of particles get pushed out into the leach field and plug up the spaces between the soil particles, slowing or maybe even stopping absorption.
Thier is no leach lines its a pit with a pump to the sewer at the street from post number 14
 
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