Sink Drain Pipe to Vent Stack is inside Exterior Concrete Wall

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Ripupthehwy

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I have concrete block house built in the 60's. The Kitchen sink drain pipe is INSIDE the exterior concrete block wall and is leaking. It connects to a vent pipe (which is about 6 feet away and runs in the wall behind fridge). I thought rather than busting up 6 feet of concrete block (a structure compromise?) Can i just bust a hole right where drain pipe joins the vent pipe and run a new pvc along wall INSIDE the house (but outside the block) and behind the fridge to the sink? This propably means a little voodoo involved when it comes to installing a couple of 90 degree elbows to run it out of the concrete wall and then along the interior of the wall. There plaster board on the wall but there's not deep enough space between it and the concrete block, hence the pipe is inside the block - stupid if you ask me. Any tips/thoughts? Thanks
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Yes, you could run a pipe parallel to the existing, abandon the old leaker in place and make connections at each end. Its likely the easiest way to do it.
 

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New vent can be AAV.

Note that the bend below ground will often clog for a kitchen. Consider a good cleanout.
 

Ripupthehwy

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New vent can be AAV.

Note that the bend below ground will often clog for a kitchen. Consider a good cleanout.
What’s kinda weird is that some days it leaks much more than others . We stopped using the kitchen drain a month ago and the water has all finally dried up that would leak along the wall behind fridge and kitchen cabinet . Yes, There was a drain clog before that I snaked and then a couple months later the leaks began. (Maybe I punched a hole in the old rusty pipe) I just spent thousands last month having entire house repiped (pex) because plumber told us we had a leak in the slab coming up through . Uh… no that wasn’t it. Anyway I did get a reduction in price but rather than calling them out again I’m more motivated to just fix the damn thing myself if I can and not spend even more $$
 

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I think a "repipe" is normally pressure piping and not drain piping.
 

Ripupthehwy

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I think a "repipe" is normally pressure piping and not drain piping.
Yes . Plumbers said the old iron water pipes in the slab were causing the leak and so we repiped the house . But it’s still leaking water along the wall where drain is located . It was misdiagnosed. Anyway I like your idea of using an AAV instead of running new pipe to the vent stack but then I assume gotta run it to sewer or dig under slab somewhere to tie it in and not sure where that is or if any less work .
 
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WorthFlorida

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BTW, you'll need to check if there is another roof vent. Older homes generally had two but when the bathroom and kitchen are next to one another, one roof vent was the norm. To use an AAV, there must be at least one roof vent for the entire home. It is not clear your intentions on capping off the leaky pipe if it would also block the air vent for the main stack.
A problem you might run into is to cut in past the leaky pipe section, that section could also be bad without enough good pipe to tap onto with a Furnco. Not to rain on your parade, if you have city sewer, in Florida many homes built in the 60's were still using clay pipe outside the home. If you need to redo your drain pipes just consider it that is might be also replaced.

If there was a leak under the slab for domestic water, the water meter would have been the tattle-tale indicator. However, 60 year old galvanized pipe was most likely at its end of life. They like to plug up with rust and restrict water flow.
 

Ripupthehwy

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BTW, you'll need to check if there is another roof vent. Older homes generally had two but when the bathroom and kitchen are next to one another, one roof vent was the norm. To use an AAV, there must be at least one roof vent for the entire home. It is not clear your intentions on capping off the leaky pipe if it would also block the air vent for the main stack.
A problem you might run into is to cut in past the leaky pipe section, that section could also be bad without enough good pipe to tap onto with a Furnco. Not to rain on your parade, if you have city sewer, in Florida many homes built in the 60's were still using clay pipe outside the home. If you need to redo your drain pipes just consider it that is might be also replaced.

If there was a leak under the slab for domestic water, the water meter would have been the tattle-tale indicator. However, 60 year old galvanized pipe was most likely at its end of life. They like to plug up with rust and restrict water flow.
There are 3 vent pipes on my roof , each corresponding to the 2 baths and one kitchen . But not sure how I would tie it into the outside drain anyways without digging up yard . I’m Leaning towards replacing the pipe to the vent stack in kitchen, running it along outside of wall .
Oh yeah I got outside drain issues coming . It’s orangeburgh pipe out in the yard to the sewer . Ugh . But that’s also motivation for me to just patch the sink drain leak for now and replace the whole system later . I’m still paying on this water repipe I just got , and yeah although I don’t think it was leaking underneath the slab - at all, I don’t regret having it done as it would be needed sometime later down the road .
 

WorthFlorida

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It's a plus when one day the home has to be sold. Let your homeowners insurance company know about the repipe as you might get a discount. To renew my homeowners for this Nov, I had to replace my 15 year old water heater even though it is in the garage. My insurance brokers stated that all insurance companies are demanding this since water damage is an expensive insurance claim. Last year when I switched to Front Line Insurance, they inspected my home's plumbing. Pictures taken under all sinks and water heater.
My son's home up the street from me cannot switch companies because he needs a new roof and could not get one done in time. He is paying big time for this policy year.

 

Ripupthehwy

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It's a plus when one day the home has to be sold. Let your homeowners insurance company know about the repipe as you might get a discount. To renew my homeowners for this Nov, I had to replace my 15 year old water heater even though it is in the garage. My insurance brokers stated that all insurance companies are demanding this since water damage is an expensive insurance claim. Last year when I switched to Front Line Insurance, they inspected my home's plumbing. Pictures taken under all sinks and water heater.
My son's home up the street from me cannot switch companies because he needs a new roof and could not get one done in time. He is paying big time for this policy year.

Just an update if anyone is interested. I repaired my leak ! It took all day but saved me thousands from hiring a plumber . I tore into my concrete block wall (yikes” with a hammer chisel and drill until I found the drain connection entombed in concrete. Turned on the kitchen sink and sore enough the copper pipe was pouring water behind the wall . I could have easily patched the hole but decided to remove all the copper and replace with pvc. I added a clean out although I’m not entirely sure I installed it correctly. I cover the hole with plywood (for now). Idk how much of a structure compromise tearing a big hole like this is but there’s no other way to get to the 3 ft long copper drain pipe . I cut a smaller hole at the opposite end under the sink and was able to fish it out in one piece.

6B7FF2CE-27BB-4524-B2A3-EFC0E3434496.jpeg
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Tuttles Revenge

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Looks good from my house ;) .. The cleanout looks like it will be very functional.

A few factors in your favor. Its doubtful that the horizontal plumbing was installed prior to the cinder blocks.. or if it was, they definitely cut the blocks in the same manner that you opened them up as you can see their cuts on the blocks. Most building is designed that if a portion is compromised the surrounding materials will hold up.
 
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