Sewage Ejector - 170 ft horizontal run

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foamypirate

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Hey Ya'll,

Looking for some input. I am currently in the process of installing a sewage ejector pump for a shop that is about 170ft horizontal, and about 3 ft head from the main septic tank. My question to you is on the fittings. I've been researching for days, and haven't found anything conclusive on whether I should be using DWV fittings or pressure rated fittings on the 2" discharge. I understand it's an open discharge, so not a true pressure application. I see a mix looking at online pictures of sewage ejector installs, but most are indoors, mine will be outdoors and buried (Liberty Pro380 Side Discharge). My heart would rest a little easier using pressure fittings, due to the length of the run, but of course, I would prefer the "action" of longer sweep DWV fittings.

My 2nd question is cleanouts...The run is entirely uphill from the ejector system, so no chance to use gravity to my benefit. That means I'll have about 150 ft of effluent and solids after my check and ball valve just sitting there. Being a shop, this is infrequently used, so I'm wondering how to approach cleanouts on a "sorta pressure" application, with such a long run. My thought was to do a double cleanout with 2" ball valves to "shut-off" the cleanouts, and then have a female threaded fitting I can thread a riser into, to get above the highest point, should I have a clog, and then I can open the ball valves to snake. Will there be any issues getting the snake through the 2" ball valves? Is this a stupid idea all together? I guess I just don't like the thought of having a 170ft run with no way to clean it out.

Thanks in advance!
 

WorthFlorida

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I'm not a plumber, I know little about septic systems, however going uphill for 150 feet is not a good idea as you stated 150' of sludge in the pipe. From the top end from a clean out, may just not work. Let's say you cleared a clog, there be no way to pump out the influent. No way to know if the clog is full open.
Besides you need some kind of check valve to hold back the sludge. If it ever fails, 150' of waste would flood your shop.

You might consider a cabin style septic unit. I came across this searching on mini septic system. If you are allowed by your jurisdiction with two systems.


Another solution is bury the 150 of pipe with a 1/8" pitch down hill into a holding tank with a sludge pump and then lift it up to the septic tank.

There are self incinerating toilets that can handle the waste.

 
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John Gayewski

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I guess I'm confused about why in the world you can't use gravity. If you wanted you could pump it to the ceiling and let gravity take over.

The problem is solids collecting at the bottom near the check valve.
 

Jeff H Young

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I guess I'm confused about why in the world you can't use gravity. If you wanted you could pump it to the ceiling and let gravity take over.

The problem is solids collecting at the bottom near the check valve.
I think he confused his words it being a 3 ft head to the septic tank . otherwise 3 ft of fall no need at all to pump
 

WorthFlorida

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I think he confused his words it being a 3 ft head to the septic tank . otherwise 3 ft of fall no need at all to pump
I think a mini septic for cabins is the best way to go.

"My 2nd question is cleanouts...The run is entirely uphill from the ejector system, so no chance to use gravity to my benefit. That means I'll have about 150 ft of effluent and solids after my check and ball valve just sitting there."
 

Jeff H Young

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John was asking why he dosent gravity drain not me but I did catch some wording turned around I m clear that gravity drainwould be an issue here
 

John Gayewski

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I'm not aware of a pump that is made to do what he's intending. Pretty much all of the pumps I've seen for this purpose tell you in the instructions to run vertical, then gravity drain immediately.
 

foamypirate

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Thanks for the input, everybody! I've opted to return the sewage ejector and pursue a different path at a later date, based on the feedback. Back to the drawing board. Definitely don't want to find myself in a crappy situation, so to speak!
 

Fitter30

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Call these people
 

Breplum

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You never said what the head of your lift was. Here is Liberty pump sizing. I ONLY recommend duplex systems. Liberty builds them ready to pipe, nothing inside to change.
1693695249893.png
 
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