Sediment Filter For Tank Water Heater

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c_g_lima

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I live in a single story house on a slab with a tank water heater inside of a closet on the main floor and all water supply lines running under the slab. I would like to have some type of sediment filtration added to a couple of cold water locations: water heater supply line and washing machine cold line. I don't see a need for a whole house filtration system, and besides, I don't believe I can even have one in my case without some major work. I think the installation in the laundry area will be straightforward; however, I do have a question about the sediment filter for the tank water heater.

Is there a recommendation/requirement on installing a sediment filter right before a tank water heater? In other words, should the filter housing be installed at a minimum pipe length from the inlet nipple on the tank because of some of the heat transfer to the inlet pipe? I have a gas unit and no expansion tank.

Any thoughts?
 

Jeff H Young

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Id stay away from the tank by a minimum 18 inches regardless of any absence of a requirement to do so.
 

WorthFlorida

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City water or a well? How old is the home? Pipes CPVC or copper?

What is the problem for wanting a sediment filter. The usual filter housing hold 10" filter cartridges are good for about 3000 gallon. Sediment could be 1000 gallons if there is a lot of sediment in the water.

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Jeff H Young

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go for it nothing wrong with having a filter . Id keep it away from the heat though
 

c_g_lima

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Just to add some additional info to my post as requested, my house was built in the mid 60s, and it has copper pipes under the slab. Originally the house had galvanized pipes above the slab at all points of service. However, some of them have been updated to either copper or PEX. A few points of service including the laundry room and kitchen sink/dishwasher still have galvanized pipes.

The water is provided by the city, and not from a well, and our city like many small cities in America is suffering from aging and decaying water supply lines.

As a result over the years I have noticed a good bit a silt in the tank water heater, so my goal with the sediment filter is to eliminate or at least reduce the amount of silt in the two target locations.
 
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c_g_lima

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Just to close this thread and thank you guys for the feedback. I do appreciate the input. :)
 
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