Question on putting up hardiplank

Users who are viewing this thread

Spfrancis

Member
Messages
129
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
Virginia
Hi there, so I was trying to understand the potential pitfalls with properly doing hardiplank. I have lost my ability to go look at the house, with the "stay at home" order , and I would have to cross state lines to go view the place. So my contractor is still pushing forward with the siding this week. We are not doing horizontal hardiplank. We wanted the look where we have vertical pieces of trim, to give the house more of a contemporary feel. So it looks like he is doing larger sheets of Hardiplank, and then I guess they put down the vertical strips on top to give it the look. I'm trying to determine what are the key things with putting hardi down in this manner. How do you protect the joints where the sheets meet together. I have read a little bit about what are the do's and don'ts of hardiplank. I wanted to see if anyone on this forum would have advice about laying hardiplank sheets, and how to handle the joints between the sheets. The Hardi is going down right on the tyvek wrap, which looks like it is okay to do. It doesn't sound like you need flashing on the joints, but wanted to get some opinions.
 

Spfrancis

Member
Messages
129
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
Virginia
I was just watching this video on horizontal flashing. This seems like a key thing, that is recommended by James Hardi.

I'm thinking that this is normal stuff that all contractors that do siding will perform.
 

Jadnashua

Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx
Messages
32,771
Reaction score
1,191
Points
113
Location
New England
Fiber Cement products like that siding got a bad rap because people were not installing them per the manufacturer's instructions. If you can't be there, it will be hard to tell if your builder is doing it according to them, but for long-term reliability, it makes a huge difference. Download and read the manufacturer's instructions, and email a copy to the builder. He should already have a copy, but knowing you're aware of the instructions may give him pause if he tries to cut a corner.

Keep in mind that the fiber in it is listed as cellulose - essentially wood fiber. So, if it is not installed properly, it can wick up moisture. Wood fiber will expand and contract with moisture content...not good for the rigid cement that's holding it together. The fibers do make it stronger and less likely to crack IF you place your fasteners properly. So, keeping it dry (obviously the paint helps a lot) is important. It's been awhile since I looked at the installation instructions, but I'd look to see if they recommend installing it over a drainage mat (often a plastic mesh), or one of the other rain shield materials. That would allow it to dry out on the back side, too, should any moisture get there.

Sealing around window and door openings properly is critical. Done right, the stuff is quite reliable...make mistakes, and you will be disappointed.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks