Pressure tank adjustment means switch adjustment too?

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Jaylivi

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Hello again,

I recently added more pressure to my two pressure tanks to 38lbs (cut in at 40). This caused my water pressure to drop quite a big, cutting out at about 45. It was noticeable with the first shower as the pressure fell quite quickly. I'm guessing that I now need to adjust the switch to accommodate the greater pressure in my tanks. Am I correct, or should I re-check the tanks to ensure I didn't add too much pressure.

Besides the showers, I need as much pressure and stored water as possible to backwash my KL and softener... as my pump is SLOW.
 
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LLigetfa

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I recently added more pressure to my two pressure tanks to the 30lbs (cut in at 40).
One or both of your gauges are liars. You need to figure out which one if either tells the truth. At a cut-in of 40 PSI, the bladder should be between 35 and 38.

Your water pressure gauge should never be able to read higher than the air pressure.
 

Jaylivi

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One or both of your gauges are liars. You need to figure out which one if either tells the truth. At a cut-in of 40 PSI, the bladder should be between 35 and 38.

Your water pressure gauge should never be able to read higher than the air pressure.

Sorry, I meant that once I drained the system, I filled the bladders to 38lbs, then turned the system back on and it cut out in the mid-40s instead of at 60lbs.

The gauges are all reading the same, just low - the only thing I changed (days ago) was to increase the empty pressure tank from 24lb to 38lb. This led me to believe that not adjusting to switch along with the bladders was the culprit.

I just adjusted the switch and it is at 51 and still climbing, slowly... but I'm heading in the right direction I think?
 
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LLigetfa

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A jet pump should have a cut-in 5 PSI higher than the bladder precharge. A sub can get away with 2 PSI higher. If you set the cut-out too high, you risk the pump dead heading and melting down.

What kind of pump do you have?
 

Jaylivi

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A jet pump should have a cut-in 5 PSI higher than the bladder precharge. A sub can get away with 2 PSI higher. If you set the cut-out too high, you risk the pump dead heading and melting down.

What kind of pump do you have?

The sticked says it is a Goulds submersible 7LS05422C installed by the previous owner in Dec. 2014. It cut out at 61 after my most recent adjustment to the switch.

And while it has my full attention, I noticed that is is running off a 110 line??? Another sticker directly below that says "CentriPro" and lists the motor at 230 volts??? I don't mean to change the topic but should this thing be running 230 instead of 110
 

Reach4

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I don't mean to change the topic but should this thing be running 230 instead of 110
The 7LS05422C should be running at 230.

I think that is a 7 GPM pump, 1/2 HP 2 wire, 10 stage.
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Jaylivi

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I did not think that a 230 pump would run on 110, but apparently it will. If this is a 230 pump, I would happily switch it over, but am nervous about fixing something that is working, and vital? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

Reach4

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I did not think that a 230 pump would run on 110, but apparently it will. If this is a 230 pump, I would happily switch it over, but am nervous about fixing something that is working, and vital? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
You could measure the resistance from up top with a good ohmmeter. Identify what size wires go down. Say how long the wires are. We could predict what resistance you should see with a 1/2 HP 230 volt motor (4.5 to 5.2) and what you should see with a 120 volt motor(1.3 to 1.8 ohms). To that we add the wire resistance for the round trip.

Resistance numbers from http://www.pacificcoastwell.com/files/GSSINGLE.pdf
 

Jaylivi

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You could measure the resistance from up top with a good ohmmeter. Identify what size wires go down. Say how long the wires are. We could predict what resistance you should see with a 1/2 HP 230 volt motor (4.5 to 5.2) and what you should see with a 120 volt motor(1.3 to 1.8 ohms). To that we add the wire resistance for the round trip.

Resistance numbers from http://www.pacificcoastwell.com/files/GSSINGLE.pdf
Thanks Reach. I will try this, but this will take some probing guesswork; I have an ohnmeter but never use it and will have to figure it out.
 

SuperGreg

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Are you sure it's 120 based on the circuit breaker? The way my pump is hooked up, only one leg of the 240v circuit runs to the pressure switch, then back to the pump controller, while the other leg goes directly to the controller. So looking at the pressure switch it appears to be 120v but it's not.
 

Craigpump

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I saw a 1 hp 5 run for close to 15 years on 115 volts, apparently the electrictian hooked it up wrong but it ran anyway. Some things we just can't explain.
 

Jaylivi

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Are you sure it's 120 based on the circuit breaker? The way my pump is hooked up, only one leg of the 240v circuit runs to the pressure switch, then back to the pump controller, while the other leg goes directly to the controller. So looking at the pressure switch it appears to be 120v but it's not.
I double checked; the pump is running on a 14/2 home run to a 15 amp fuse.

Though the stickers left by the installer seam to be conclusive that this pump wants to be on a 240v circuit, I haven't found the guts to change anything for fear of breaking a pump that is slow, but working. What would ya'll do?

I'm trying to reach the company that installed, but the guy who did this has passed away I'm told.
 

Jaylivi

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I cannot speak for ALL but since I know how to use an ohmmeter, I would ohm it out. If I were you, I would learn how to use the meter or hire a professional that can.

You're right. Ok, I have my meter; I assume I should separate the 12 wire running to the pump from everything else and test the resistance? But in order to know what the value tells me I think I need to know how long the wires are, which is an x factor. Is this correct?
 

Reach4

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But in order to know what the value tells me I think I need to know how long the wires are, which is an x factor. Is this correct?
Take the reading. If the number is low enough, there may not be an ambiguity. For example, if you read 4.1 ohms, we would know that is not a 1/2 HP 230 volt pump, even though we knew nothing about the wires.

Estimate the distance to the well. Guess how far down the well pump is based on how far down it is for a neighbor or two.

I hope your ohmmeter has a low enough scale.
 
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LLigetfa

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If the number is low enough, there may not be an ambiguity.
Eggs act lee. A 240V motor has higher resistance than a 120V motor and the length of wire cannot lower the resistance reading, ergo if the resistance of wire+motor is lower than the spec for a 240V motor it must be a 120V motor.
 
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