PEX Shut Off

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jeanette

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Are those little white plastic shut off valves that you just push in to start water or pull out to stop water very good? They seem flimsy to me. They are by Aqua Pex.
 

Reach4

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Could your post a photo? AquaPex is a brand of pex pipe. The Accor FlowTite valves you pull to close the valve, and you push to pass the water.
 
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Jadnashua

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You can use any compression shutoff valve IF you have the appropriate stiffener to insert into the end of the pipe. Otherwise, trying to clamp on a flexible pipe won't work and either the valve will come off, or it will leak. IOW, a compression valve you could put on a copper pipe will work fine with the stiffener inside of the pex tubing (their OD is identical). You can buy valves with them packaged in there, or buy some of them separately, and use any compression valve. An alternative that will work, but can spin on the end of the pipe, would be a Sharkbite, or similar style push-on valve...they have the internal stiffener as part of the device.
 

FullySprinklered

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I installed a number of plastic shutoffs on a repipe maybe two years ago. Customer provided all the expansion fittings for the job. The stops were white plastic and functioned by rotating a nib on the side of the valve body. Looks something like fuel filter. Didn't inspire confidence on first glance.
 

jeanette

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I REMOVE Accor valves, I never install them.
I just had house galvanized pipe replaced with Aqua Pex and these are the shut off valves used. They seem flimsy to me, but I am just a 70 year old female customer. Do you think these will give me trouble later? Should I wait for a failure and then have them replaced?
 

FullySprinklered

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Had a customer a couple of weeks ago, Indian guy. Sub-continent Indian. He asked me about the warranty on my work. I told him my work comes with a lifetime warranty."LIFETIME WARRANTY?" he asked. I said: yep, "I'll be 65 this year, you do the math."
He said : Ho,ho you funny man.
 
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jeanette

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Could your post a photo? AquaPex is a brand of pex pipe. The Accor FlowTite valves you push to close the valve, and you pull to pass the water.
 

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jeanette

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Here is picture of shut off with new PEX
 

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Jadnashua

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The only advantage I can see with that type of fitting is that they are quick and cheap for the installer. Neither the valve nor the attached hose is great quality. They can last a long time, but each time you flex the hose or shut the valve off/on, you will shorten its life. IF it never gets touched, it could last a very long time. I'd want to know where the main water shutoff was, and ensure it works in case one of them does fail.
 

Jadnashua

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They push on, have a spiked, stainless steel ring that resists pulling it off (but it will with enough force). Some just take really large pliers and break them off. Then, you can install a new valve to the stub that will be sticking out of the wall. If the end of the pipe is really scratched up from the spikes, you may need a valve soldered on verses using a compression one. Cracking the plastic with the pliers then cutting off the spiked ring may minimize the scratching. See what one of the pros has to say about their results from removing them, and what tends to work best.
 

CountryBumkin

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If it is already installed, I would leave it alone until it fails (maybe never). But have a replacement part handy (when/if it fails it will be on a holiday).

Pulling hard on pipe that is in the wall or breaking the fitting apart with pliers can leave you with bigger problems if your not experienced in this work.
 

Johndoejohndoes

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They push on, have a spiked, stainless steel ring that resists pulling it off (but it will with enough force). Some just take really large pliers and break them off. Then, you can install a new valve to the stub that will be sticking out of the wall. If the end of the pipe is really scratched up from the spikes, you may need a valve soldered on verses using a compression one. Cracking the plastic with the pliers then cutting off the spiked ring may minimize the scratching. See what one of the pros has to say about their results from removing them, and what tends to work best.
I'm trying to remove one in my bathroom and it's attached to PEX. I've been looking at videos and this seems to be the best one I can find.


Any other advice on how to remove or should I follow this?

Thanks!
 
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