Moving a vertical drain line

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Rret2lib

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Hello,

I am installing a wall mounted faucet in a few days and for that I need to put a 2x4 blocking right about where the PEX comes in. The drain pipe is smack dab in the middle so I have to move it to accommodate for the faucet required depth.

I am planning on using two 45's on each end of the diversion and moving the pipe to the left.

Should I squeeze the pipe to the back of the stud bay and have the 2x4 blocking in the front? This is an exterior 2x6 wall.
Or is it recommended to divert the drain through another stud bay? As in do a 45 above the sani tee, go to the left stud bay with a hole saw and come back in above the faucet?

Thanks!
Harry


bNLM6oV.jpg
 

John Gayewski

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Generally is easier if you can keep the drain/vent piping in another bay with a small arm over to catch the drain. The water can then do as it wishes with no restrictions or crossing.
 

Rret2lib

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Thanks!

I want to avoid moving the entire stack if possible. If I keep it in the same stud bay, the insulation would be compressed by the pipe along the exterior wall. It's going to be a bit of a pain to move it to the other stud bay but I can do it if needed. If I want to create a small diversion in the pipe - I read somewhere that I have to ease the transition using two 45s instead of a 90 but I can't find any info in the UPC for this.
 

wwhitney

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So what is the depth of the stud bay, the size of the pipe, and the depth required for mounting/blocking the faucet?

Presumably the pipe above the san-tee is a dry vent, i.e. nothing drains down from above. If so, below an elevation that is 6" above the fixture flood rim, any jog in the dry vent has to be with 22.5s or 45s, not 90s, as the dry vent can't be horizontal. But if you want to go to the trouble of moving to another stud bay, you can use 90s on the drain side (the 90 where drainage changes from vertical to horizontal has to be a LT90), and then if your vent reconnection is at least 6" above the flood rim you can use 90s there as well.

If relocating within the stud bay, 45s seems more elegant and would allow for a smaller offset.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rret2lib

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Thanks Wayne. The stud bay is 5.5 inches deep and this is a 2 inch pipe. The face of the blocking has to be 70mm (2.76 inches) from the finished wall. Accounting for Hardie + tile this comes out to approximately 2 inch (2.05) depth between face of the blocking to the stud.

The 2x material is 1.5 inch in depth, so that leaves 3.5 inches of space behind the blocking.

Best,
Harry
 

wwhitney

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That would be 3.5" behind the face of the blocking, or 2" behind the back of the blocking. A 2" nominal pipe is 2.375" OD, so there's no way to fit it in the same stud bay. Moving it over a bay seems like the way to go. The one to the left is narrow but to the right is a double stud--what is that supporting? A window to the upper right?

Cheers, Wayne

PS Depending on how wide the faucet block needs to be, you could subdivide the existing bay with a new full height 2x4 stud, notched at the back where you jog the existing stack to the other side of the 2x4. Then your faucet block runs from 2x4 to 2x6; an upright block on the other side of the 2x4 would further support the 2x4.

Or you could do something similar but with 2x4 flat blocks across the the stud bay above and below your faucet block; then a short vertical block to support the end of the faucet block.
 

Rret2lib

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You are right, there is a window on the upper right side, a stud over.
This is the spec from the faucet.
1665427256125.png


If I subdivide the existing wall with a 2x4, does the existing stack need to move as well?

Best,
Harry
 

wwhitney

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How about you take the diagram above, remove the markings about hole diameter (doesn't matter for this), add in a line for the face of the wall framing, add or reiterate the depth of the faucet body from the face of the wall framing, and add the stud locations relative to where you want the spout?

So really I'm just asking for 3 numbers: the left right layout will be left-hand face of stud, X" clear, 6-11/16" width of faucet body, Y" clear, face of right hand stud. And confirmation that the rear of the faucet body is 2" behind the plane of the edges of the studs.

Also, are the water supplies connected from above or below, or in at the ends?

Cheers, Wayne
 

Rret2lib

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Thanks for your time Wayne.

Here's a diagram:
1665433615991.png


The back of the faucet block should be 2'' from the face of the stud.
The existing drain starts 4-1/4'' from the left stud.

The water lines come from the crawlspace below and the tee you see on the right takes water to the toilet supply.
Since I have to come up with the hot line from below, I was thinking of using a PEX support lower in the wall and do a 90 to hook up directly to the bottom of the faucet block.

Best,
Harry
 

wwhitney

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Ah, I see you mean "faucet block" for "faucet body", while I meant "faucet block" for "block of wood the faucet body mounts to."

Anyway, I suggest you just jog your stack with a pair of 45s (times two) above and below your faucet body. Then (or rather while the stack has been cut out, before you reinstall the jogged section), put a 2x4 (or taller) upright block between the studs, against the sheathing, behind the faucet body. You'll still have a 2" gap between the face of that block and the faucet body. You could add another 2" thick block to the face of the 2x4 block, just behind the faucet body. Or if the faucet body mounting holes are all at a single elevation, you could use a flatwise 2x4 block that screws to the top or bottom of your upright 2x4 block between studs, setting the the elevation of the upright 2x4 block accordingly.

Cheers, Wayne
 

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Rret2lib

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Yes, I think this makes sense! You are essentially saying that there is no need to leave the stud bay and I can just jog the stack to the left using 2 sets of 45s. That's a great idea! The backing can then be screwed on the 2x4 to reach the required depth.

Excellent - thanks so much!

P.S - unrelated to this issue, are wall mounted faucets required to have accessible shut-off valves?
 

Jeff H Young

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Ah, I see you mean "faucet block" for "faucet body", while I meant "faucet block" for "block of wood the faucet body mounts to."

Anyway, I suggest you just jog your stack with a pair of 45s (times two) above and below your faucet body. Then (or rather while the stack has been cut out, before you reinstall the jogged section), put a 2x4 (or taller) upright block between the studs, against the sheathing, behind the faucet body. You'll still have a 2" gap between the face of that block and the faucet body. You could add another 2" thick block to the face of the 2x4 block, just behind the faucet body. Or if the faucet body mounting holes are all at a single elevation, you could use a flatwise 2x4 block that screws to the top or bottom of your upright 2x4 block between studs, setting the the elevation of the upright 2x4 block accordingly.

Cheers, Wayne
Thanks for your time Wayne.

Here's a diagram:
View attachment 86949

The back of the faucet block should be 2'' from the face of the stud.
The existing drain starts 4-1/4'' from the left stud.

The water lines come from the crawlspace below and the tee you see on the right takes water to the toilet supply.
Since I have to come up with the hot line from below, I was thinking of using a PEX support lower in the wall and do a 90 to hook up directly to the bottom of the faucet block.

Best,
Harry
Harry, Just a note normally the valve should be placed according to the Finish surface not from face of a stud as manufacture dosent know whats going on the wall . just wanted to throw that detail in there you dont want to open wall back up later. no other comment you probebly are aware of this good luck on it!
 

Rret2lib

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Can't you just move the sink over?
But I would still need to move the drain line since it interferes with the faucet installation (I think)?
Harry, Just a note normally the valve should be placed according to the Finish surface not from face of a stud as manufacture dosent know whats going on the wall . just wanted to throw that detail in there you dont want to open wall back up later. no other comment you probebly are aware of this good luck on it!
Thanks Jeff! Since this is a wall-mounted faucet and there will be no vanity (just a countertop/slab) , It's going to be hard to conceal those valves. Also I think I would need a very long inline valve to do this?
 

wwhitney

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But I would still need to move the drain line since it interferes with the faucet installation (I think)?
If the valve body has no side connections, and you slide it to the right tight to the stud, then it might just fit between the vent and the stud, based on your measurements. Plastic DWV is a little flexible, so you might be able to strap the pipe to the left hand stud to gain another 1/4" or 1/2".

Not saying that's a good idea.

Cheers, Wayne
 

John Gayewski

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If you say so. There's more than one way to skin a cat. In the future we generally "arm over" to go around a window or for a laundry when there's a busy area with drain, water, and vent. By "arm over" I mean tee to the left through the stud for the drain. But if you have it how you want it then run with it.
 

Jeff H Young

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I don't see the problem? I thought the vent was interfering with the wall hung valve. hindsight is 20 20 , isn't the only sensible thing to do at this point to move the vent? 4 , 45s oh well , plenty of room to fit the block of wood in it is a 2x6 wall .
 
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