Moving a toilet, need to plumb it

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wwhitney

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Indiana uses the 2006 (!) IPC, so the minimum vent size for a WC should be 1-1/2", half the minimum drain size for a WC.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Zelbrew

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Indiana uses the 2006 (!) IPC, so the minimum vent size for a WC should be 1-1/2", half the minimum drain size for a WC.

Cheers, Wayne
I looked it up but wasn't positive, so I'm glad you confirmed it for me. I thought that is what I had seen in the attic.

So is it based on the fixture or the whole system? Seems like the whole vent system would have to be the size of the largest fixture vent.
 

Zelbrew

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Here is a sketch of what I was imagining. Is this the way to go, or is there a better way to do it? Not sure of the names of the fittings and whatnot. The view of the sketch is pretty much the same view as the pic (posting again for ease). To the right in the sketch is the connection to the main line in the middle of the pic, and unless my spatial sense is really bad, I think the toilet will be located adjacent to that last section of the main line after it drops down.
 

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Zelbrew

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Here is a sketch of what I was imagining. Is this the way to go, or is there a better way to do it? Not sure of the names of the fittings and whatnot. The view of the sketch is pretty much the same view as the pic (posting again for ease). To the right in the sketch is the connection to the main line in the middle of the pic, and unless my spatial sense is really bad, I think the toilet will be located adjacent to that last section of the main line after it drops down.
Does this sound OK? Looking around, I see that for that fitting into the main line I should use a wye and a 45 instead of a sanitary t or something.

Should use a 3 x 1.5 wye for the fitting for the vent as well? I assume for the vent is just 90s and whatever gets up the wall and into the system in the attic.

I guess to get the vent in the wall I'll slide one piece of pipe down through the wall bottom plate and one up into the attic and join in the middle? (After removing drywall) Unless there is some other trick to getting 10 feet of pipe in there
 

Reach4

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Does this sound OK? Looking around, I see that for that fitting into the main line I should use a wye and a 45 instead of a sanitary t or something.

Should use a 3 x 1.5 wye for the fitting for the vent as well? I assume for the vent is just 90s and whatever gets up the wall and into the system in the attic.
It is unclear what you are referring to. If you are referring to the fitting right under the toilet, you need a wye to dry vent the toilet.

But then there is the thing in the lower right labeled as "this". What is that doing? The drawing shows a "combo" which is a combination wye plus 45. It is not clear where that fits into the rest of the picture. Depending on what the port on top is doing, a combo may or may not be needed. But a combo is certainly very good, whether that is venting or if both inlets carry waste.
 

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It is unclear what you are referring to. If you are referring to the fitting right under the toilet, you need a wye to dry vent the toilet.

But then there is the thing in the lower right labeled as "this". What is that doing? The drawing shows a "combo" which is a combination wye plus 45. It is not clear where that fits into the rest of the picture. Depending on what the port on top is doing, a combo may or may not be needed. But a combo is certainly very good, whether that is venting or if both inlets carry waste.
Sorry it was unclear. The bit on the right is a view of the main waste pipe from the side--90 degrees turned compared with the rest of the sketch. This is the fitting at the end of the toilet run as it drops into the main waste, which is at the bottom of the main part of the sketch, represented by a circle.

I read elsewhere this should be a wye plus a 45 bend (or a combo).
 

Reach4

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OK. the drawing on the left is a side view, and on the right, there is a top view of just the bottom of the left view. Is that it?

The two 45s alone will not be able to turn down for a ways, and also output horizontally. Since the toilet is already vented, your combo can be tilted up whatever it takes. If the combo was tilted to be in the vertical plane, then two 45s could meet up with the combo. Maybe that is what you were describing.

There are other ways too, some of which might use three 45s.
 
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John Gayewski

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I guess to get the vent in the wall I'll slide one piece of pipe down through the wall bottom plate and one up into the attic and join in the middle? (After removing drywall) Unless there is some other trick to getting 10 feet of pipe in there
If your going uninterrupted from the roof to the crawlspace you could get a 20" pipe and drill your holes in alignment and feed a single piece from the roof down to the crawl space. I've done similar, but you have to have good measurements or a really nice laser like I have. I really love my laser if anyone cares. Milwaukee makes an m12 dot/line laser. It really helps with layout.
 

Jeff H Young

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If your going uninterrupted from the roof to the crawlspace you could get a 20" pipe and drill your holes in alignment and feed a single piece from the roof down to the crawl space. I've done similar, but you have to have good measurements or a really nice laser like I have. I really love my laser if anyone cares. Milwaukee makes an m12 dot/line laser. It really helps with layout.
Laser very handy especially on commercial work almost mandatory , things are changing on big buildings , hospitals and such with lay out using a computer apparatus like a surveyor uses called a tremble or trimble but on smaller jobs we still layout and snap chalk lines on floor and laser up all our hangar locations and measure out all our cut pieces and fittings on floor. hanging 15 foot of string with a plumb bob on a windy day takes forever.
good idea though in a shaft or even tight space up multiple floors
 

Jeff H Young

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Not going through the roof; hooking up to venting in the attic.
no problem looks good BTW sketch in post number 43 of yours appears to show a santee on back not for any type of drainage coming down the vertical branch
 

Zelbrew

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no problem looks good BTW sketch in post number 43 of yours appears to show a santee on back not for any type of drainage coming down the vertical branch
Didn't get a chance until now to post another sketch until now (to clarify, posts 46 and 47). I realized after the fact that a santee is not to be used on its back, so I have replaced that with a wye/45. This sketch shows just the end of the toilet run dropping into the main line. It replaces the detail on the right of my original sketch (post 43). Just a reminder that everything is 3".

So, given the two sketches and the pic, am I on the right track?

Also, I guess I will have to go with my plan of splitting my vent pipe, half going down to the crawlspace and half into the attic and using a union in the wall, as I don't think I'll have clearance to put it through in a single piece. I'll see how much room I have in the attic when I get up there. Unless I am missing an easier way to vent the toilet.
plumbing side sketch small.jpg
 

John Gayewski

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If anyone is curious (which I'm sure no one is) I did in fact try a 3" ball through an offset flange. It doesn't pass through. I'd still use one, but I'd be prepared to plead with an inspector.
 

Reach4

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Offset flanges are designed to help contractors solve everyday
problems like a mispositioned pipe or an inconveniently located
floor joist. What makes the FullFlush™ and DropKick™ unique is
their full-flow capacity – which will allow a 3" ball will pass
through unobstructed. The FullFlush has a 3" Sch. 40 Hub
connection, which will fit into 4" pipe. The DropKick’s 3" spigot
outlet easily connects to any fitting hub.

sioux-chief-dropkick.jpg
 
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