Max flow shower valve

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smags

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Hello everyone. I am remodeling my shower and want to replace the valve and fixtures. I have 1/2 supply lines running to the valve. I will be replacing the mixing valve since I have the opportunity. I don't care if it's a single handle mixing valve or thermostatic mixing valve (separate volume and Temperature controls) and I am not too concerned about the cost of the valve because I want to enjoy my shower every single day. I have 1/2" supply lines running to the valve. I don't have a brand preference.....what I don't want is some valve that somehow restricts the flow of water to my shower head.....I'm not exactly sure how these valves work but I know that some have higher gpm flow rates than others. I realize that the shower head also matters, and that my water pressure PSI also matters but it is the valve that I'm asking about. Does anyone have any suggestions....Delta, Moen, Kohler......cheap, expensive.....doesn't matter. I just want a good valve with maximum flow rate. Temp rite or Positemp....I don't care about any of that stuff.....I just want full available flow based on my current supply and PSI. I do not have multiple shower heads......It's just a 5' x 3' shower with one shower head. -thanks all, I appreciate any pro's opinions!
 

Elton Noway

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In your case, another way to say "Full Flow" (using your existing plumbing)... is "I want the maximum gpm (gallons per minute) the law allows in my area." Be aware, in the US the gpm flow rates vary from state to state but thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (in order to save water) the most you can hope for is 2.5 gpm from a shower head, some states are even lower. Some people suggest removing the flow restrictor in the shower head but most manufactures have now integrated the restrictor deep inside the shower head making it near impossible. Anyway... back to your valve search your best bet would be to pull specs for the various suppliers and to narrow your selection down to which valve advertise the highest gpm from the shower port and/or tub spout. For example here's of a Delta chart

Delta valves.jpg


FYI: I remodeled a early 1980's bathroom a year ago and was planning on the new shower to give a showering experience as luxurious as the one I tore out. However, after reading about the 1992 flow restrictions I discovered I'd probably have to give up on the idea of maintaining the drenching, glorious, deluge of water. My bathroom, just like yours, only had a simple overhead shower, nothing fancy but in my search for how to maintain the flow I had and wanted... I picked up a neat trick here in Terrys forum.

NET: Shower/tub diverter valves don't restrict flow to the tub spout port as much as they do to the shower port because people don't want to wait 30 minutes while the bath tub slowly fills. Check out Delta chart above and notice the R10000-UNBX provides more gpm to the tub spout than to the shower.) The trick is to buy a shower/tub diverter valve, cap off the port intended for the shower head and route the port intended for the tub spout around and up to the shower head. I worked for me : ) NET: With no restrictors in the valves tub spout port then all you have to do is find a unrestricted shower head.
 
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Jeff H Young

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I didnt hear him qualify by saying maximum flow available by law he just wants maximum flow lol . yea using bottom port on the one mentioned looks like the best flow
 

GReynolds929

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Here you go... (HINT: if the link below doesn't work you can get at Home Depot)... and they'll ship them right to your door.
Delta R10000 Valves
I was replying to a bot because delta doesn't make a "Temp Rite" valve. Kohler has a "RiteTemp". The valve you linked to is Delta's universal rough in valve, and I would never by something like that from home repo, my supply house is a much better way to go.
 

Jeff H Young

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I was replying to a bot because delta doesn't make a "Temp Rite" valve. Kohler has a "RiteTemp". The valve you linked to is Delta's universal rough in valve, and I would never by something like that from home repo, my supply house is a much better way to go.
Some postings seem fake or a Bot , what are they doing try to hack in on something? Im not mention the names but S A are some initials
 

James23912

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In your case, another way to say "Full Flow" (using your existing plumbing)... is "I want the maximum gpm (gallons per minute) the law allows in my area." Be aware, in the US the gpm flow rates vary from state to state but thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (in order to save water) the most you can hope for is 2.5 gpm from a shower head, some states are even lower. Some people suggest removing the flow restrictor in the shower head but most manufactures have now integrated the restrictor deep inside the shower head making it near impossible. Anyway... back to your valve search your best bet would be to pull specs for the various suppliers and to narrow your selection down to which valve advertise the highest gpm from the shower port and/or tub spout. For example here's of a Delta chart

View attachment 97901

FYI: I remodeled a early 1980's bathroom a year ago and was planning on the new shower to give a showering experience as luxurious as the one I tore out. However, after reading about the 1992 flow restrictions I discovered I'd probably have to give up on the idea of maintaining the drenching, glorious, deluge of water. My bathroom, just like yours, only had a simple overhead shower, nothing fancy but in my search for how to maintain the flow I had and wanted... I picked up a neat trick here in Terrys forum.

NET: Shower/tub diverter valves don't restrict flow to the tub spout port as much as they do to the shower port because people don't want to wait 30 minutes while the bath tub slowly fills. Check out Delta chart above and notice the R10000-UNBX provides more gpm to the tub spout than to the shower.) The trick is to buy a shower/tub diverter valve, cap off the port intended for the shower head and route the port intended for the tub spout around and up to the shower head. I worked for me : ) NET: With no restrictors in the valves tub spout port then all you have to do is find a unrestricted shower head.
that is interesting, can you just reverse both ends even if the tub fills slows more slowly? Mostly take showers anyway and also have a jet tub in another bathroom
 

Jeff H Young

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that is interesting, can you just reverse both ends even if the tub fills slows more slowly? Mostly take showers anyway and also have a jet tub in another bathroom
It might work ok with modification. or not Delta might know
 

John Gayewski

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We use delta. They have a flow restrictor in the shower head that you can take out which in most cases takes you from 1.75 gpm to 2gpm.

There are plenty of showerheads that are capable of giving you 2.5 gpm the valve shouldn't restrict the flow enough to give you a shower you won't enjoy, it's all about the head.
 
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