Loud Humming Noise From Outside Faucet

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Peter Taylor, Apr 8, 2015.

  1. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Hello folks this is my first time in here. There is an outside faucet in our home that started making loud humming sounds. Yet the noise goes off as soon as we turn it on. It also goes off if any other indoors water source is on and that includes the faucet underneath the toilets. humming noise (like a foghorn) coming from the pipes. It is loudest right at the main shut off valve inside the house (which is in a closet).

    This same outdoor faucet has a strange pipe attached on its side with some sort of lever. And when that faucet is turn off I am able to switch the lever and it releases water from the small pipe. Here are a couple of pix to make it easier to explain. Any help is welcome as to how I can solve this issue. Also please let me know the tools needed to solve this issue. TIA :) Peter faucet_0321.JPG
     

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  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    That valve with a lever appears to be a pressure relief valve. When it is making noise, are you getting any drips out of it?

    You may want to pick up a water pressure gauge and check your water pressure. Get one with a sec0nd, peak reading hand and just screw it onto the hose bib (you can buy them with that fitting, or others). If you have a pressure reduction valve, it may be defective. Or, if you do, and you (should) have an expansion tank, the expansion tank may be waterlogged, and need replacement. If there's a utility company check valve on your water inlet, and you do not have an expansion tank, the noise may be from the WH expanding the water volume when it heats, and the check valve is being overcome because it is worn a little - opening and closing rapidly can create the vibration. Water in the home can peak quite high until something leaks, and since the pipes don't expand much of any, any little expansion of the water can create big pressure rise until something relieves it.
     
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  4. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Yes it drips when is off and still keeps humming. If I turn any other faucet then noise goes off. Right now I have the main water line off for is driving every one crazy in our home. The house was built in 1926 but the pipes have been change.

    I will try to get the water pressure at homedepot, then from there how do I know if the pressure is too high? it will have low, normal and red warning zone levels :)
    1. Where is the water pressure reduction valve found and how do I know if is defective?

    2. Where is the expansion tank located and how can I tell if is waterlogged?

    3. By H2O inlets you mean where I turn and shut off the main line?

    THANKS so much for your tips.


     
  5. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Also it will solve the issue if I saw off that extra part where the pressure relief valve is attached and seal it off so I only have the faucet like most of them are.
     
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
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    New England
    It's dripping for one of two reasons: excessive pressure or it is worn out. And, it's probably because of pressure. WHat's happening (I think) is that it is opening and closing rapidly to relieve the pressure. When you open any valve in the house to run water, you've provided an outlet, and the pressure drops enough so that that valve won't open to relieve it. That fluttering of the valve can make some pretty annoying, loud sounds.

    By code, if your water pressure is <80psi, you are supposed to reduce it to that, or lower level. That's <80psi any time, and if you have a check valve or a pressure reduction valve in your house, you also need an expansion tank.

    1. Normally, near where the water comes into the house. By monitoring the pressure gauge and checking the peak pressure, you will be testing both the PRV and the expansion tank which work together. If the ET is bad, and you have one, you can probably tell by knocking on it. It should be mostly full of air, but if it thuds, or is heavy, or if the air fill valve leaks water, it's bad. BTW, IF you have one and it's not leaking water, you can check your water pressure by just using a tire pressure gauge since when hooked to the system, the air pressure will be the same as the water pressure.

    2. Google expansion tanks to get a picture of one. It should be somewhere on the cold water inlet before the water heater. There is not supposed to be any shutoff valve between it and the WH, so it should be nearby.

    3. Water inlet to the home - most water utilities are replacing water meters with one that has a built-in check valve, or are adding one. This protects their water supply in case there's a hiccup, polluted water from your house can't back flow into the supply system and poison everyone on the street.
     
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  7. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    WOW I am very grateful for your well detailed helpful comments. That said, is it possible to just saw that part off and seal it and just have the faucet like a regular one?
     
  8. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Yes...having a pressure relief valve there is not a very common thing. If you DO have excessive pressure, it's best to not waste water all of the time and use a PRV (pressure reduction valve) instead...that will also allow you to maintain a fairly constant pressure 24/7.

    When you open a faucet somewhere, do you tend to get a higher spurt of pressure which quickly drops off, especially after someone has used a lot of hot water? If so, that is an indication you have a closed system, and need an expansion tank, that spurt is relieving the excess pressure in the pipes. Things like faucet supply lines, washing machine hoses, etc. will balloon a lott more than copper. They'll spring back to their normal shape (well, some stretching may be permanent) when you open a valve to relieve that excessive pressure. The pressure gauge will be the proof, and until then, don't make any rash decisions.
     
  9. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    I will get the pressure gauge first and take it from there. Again I am very grateful. Have a great day and keep sharing your knowledge while making a difference.

    Yes...having a pressure relief valve there is not a very common thing. If you DO have excessive pressure, it's best to not waste water all of the time and use a PRV (pressure reduction valve) instead...that will also allow you to maintain a fairly constant pressure 24/7.

    When you open a faucet somewhere, do you tend to get a higher spurt of pressure which quickly drops off, especially after someone has used a lot of hot water? If so, that is an indication you have a closed system, and need an expansion tank, that spurt is relieving the excess pressure in the pipes. Things like faucet supply lines, washing machine hoses, etc. will balloon a lott more than copper. They'll spring back to their normal shape (well, some stretching may be permanent) when you open a valve to relieve that excessive pressure. The pressure gauge will be the proof, and until then, don't make any rash decisions.[/QUOTE]
     
  10. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Jim I went to HomeDepot and got the gauge and a stopper or cover for the pipe. They didn't have the GP that you mentioned but the one I bought work well. I measure the pressure at the same faucet with the problem. It was reading less than 70psi.

    Then I took out the valve relieve valve pressure, which wasn't hard to do, then inserted the plug or stopper in there. The humming noise is gone so that is great. But I did noticed that now the pressure shot all the way to 180psi :( Perhaps that is why the PRV was there to start with. Apparently it went bad and then started dripping and making the terrible humming noise. So my choices now are:

    1. Buy a new PRV so it can control the H2O?

    2. Fix the high water pressure issue and how?

    3. Any other ideas?

    Also I do have an expansion tank in my basement attach to our water heater. I included 2 pix too. I noticed that the cooper pipe attached to it has been leaking which I dont know what that means besides been bad & needing replacement. Or perhaps the expansion tank should also be replace. As far as I can remember it hasn't been done in over 8 yrs.

    Thanks again!

    BTW faucet_0328.JPG



     

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  11. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    I now remember that you mentioned this "PRV (pressure reduction valve) instead...that will also allow you to maintain a fairly constant pressure 24/7." So where is that attached to? TIA!
     
  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    My guess is that that ET is shot...I'd replace it being that it is over 8-years old. And, I'd use a brass nipple to attach it, not an iron one, even a galvanize one. What I could not tell for sure is whether the ET is on the cold side or the hot side. IT must be on the cold, or inlet side to the WH.

    A PRV is adjustable, and can go anywhere you can fit it on the cold inlet pipe from outside. Some people like to have their hose bibs fed with the full pressure, so if yours branches to them is in a convenient place, you could patch in a PRV after that branch. Double-check your pressure after you've run some water. IF it is from expansion, it will drop unless the WH is running to reheat incoming cold water. It's the volume change of the cold to hot water that is the issue, and it can raise the pressure. Now, it should NEVER have gotten to 180, as the T&P safety valve on the WH SHOULD have opened at 150psi to drain off any high pressure. If that did NOT open, it needs to be replaced as well. Excess pressure to your plumbing bits is really hard on things like supply lines made with hoses, or plastic, especially when the water is hot. Leave the pressure relief valve in place until you get a PRV in there to protect those devices.

    Once you have the PRV installed, it is adjustable. You need to decide where you want it to be. Once you've decided that, using something like a bicycle tire pump, pump up the ET to that pressure, then install it. As I said earlier, once connected to the water line and the water is on, the air pressure will be the same as the water pressure, so you must adjust it before installing it or with the water off and a valve open so you aren't trying to compress water (which doesn't work!).
     
  13. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Again thank you. I will read this a few times until I can digest it :) And I was wrong the psi shot to almost 160 instead of 180psi but is still high. You can see it on the photo.

    I look at pics of the PRV and now I remember that we have one attached to the incoming line at the front of the house.



     
  14. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Jim I went back to the home depot and came home 20 mins ago.

    I replace the plug with a new P&T. As soon as the mainline H2O came on it stripped the A&T for the pressure is still 160psi and is dripping again but not humming noises.

    As I mentioned the mainline does have a PRV similar to this one http://www.plumbersurplus.com/Prod/...educing-Valve-Series-3-4-0069717/5731/Cat/189. Now I will try to adjusted it.

    So if that doesn't work at all then do you think is the extension tank?

    OK I am editing my post. I adjusted the PRV going counter clock with the top screw and my pressure water is still 160psi :(


     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2015
  15. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Retired Systems engineer for defense industry.
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    If you open a valve and the pressure drops, and does not rise unless the WH is running, the existing PRV is working. If you use some hot water (enough to cause the WH to turn on), and then stop, if the pressure rises, that's an indication that the ET is shot. It's easy to check the ET...it should be full of mostly air. IF it's not, it has likely failed.
     
  16. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor New Member

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    Jim I know my limitations and will hired a plumber :) It seems that one of those two things, or both, may need to be fix. And by his/her recommendation I will probably get any new equipment too. Again thank you so much for all your tips. and now I know where to come for help :)
    :cool:;)
     
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