Leaking from Drain Assembly (New Vanity Faucet Kit)

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tom2005

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Hi everyone,

I'm almost finishing the project of remodeling my Master Bathroom (it has been a challenge for months). This week came the plumber to install the 2 faucets/drain assembly kit on my Vanity. At the beginning everything seemed well connected and no leaks. But actually there were, specially when I fully test it by filling the sink completely with the stopper closed. He has come a second time, and he told me that must be a bad quality red washer that goes in the connection of the drain assembly (metal) with the plastic pipe that goes to the P trap (Picture 1).
After some tests I did by myself again, I could notice the water was actually PONDING there in that junction, so actually it was coming from an upper part (Picture 2) specifically under that big nut. I sent that picture to the seller from Amazon (where I purchased these 2 kits/assemblies) and the seller says this: "it seems that the opening of your ceramic sink is not flat, causing water leakage" and he suggested me as a solution what is shown here on picture 3 (to use "anti-leak" putty on sink opening). My question: is this a good troubleshoot for this leaking ? I mean, before calling the plumber for a 3rd time to come again to check this, I wanted to be sure of this response from seller, and discard the option that the drain assemblies are actually defective. I'm the owner the the property, I'm not a plumber, but I just wanted to understand the mechanics here. By the way, during the tests I did, I was placing my fingers around that white plastic/rubber that touches the ceramic bottom opening, and it was dry. Water was right under the big nut.

Thanks in advance
 

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Chucky_ott

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I'd probably agree with the seller's recommendation unless your sink has an overflow. Water getting into the overflow would bypass that seal.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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That is the location that typically leaks on a bathroom sink. The issue is that the rubber gasket has to seal against the sink on the flat part and also against the brass vertical portion at the threads. Many plumbers wipe some pipe dope or silicone against the threads where the gasket will make contact to fill the voids in the threads that the gasket can't make up.

Most manufacturers use a finer thread than those pictured which allows the gasket to seal easier.
 

tom2005

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Thanks for the replies guys.
...unless your sink has an overflow
Yes it has an overflow, and actually the leak happens more noticeable when water reaches the overflow in the full sink test.

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Many plumbers wipe some pipe dope or silicone against the threads
Plumber is coming today for a third time. I will mention him this, which I guess will improve the contact. Thanks
 

GReynolds929

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Thanks for the replies guys.

Yes it has an overflow, and actually the leak happens more noticeable when water reaches the overflow in the full sink test.

View attachment 95500


Plumber is coming today for a third time. I will mention him this, which I guess will improve the contact. Thanks
Plumber, or Handyman? There's a difference. Most plumbers know this step already.
 

tom2005

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Yes I know the difference, but I say plumber because that's how he introduces himself, however at this point, I'm not sure if he is, and I will explain why: I haven't had much luck when hiring pros to work on this bathroom remodeling during the entire project. Many issues (not related to this thread) and one of them deserves to be mentioned here: The plumber I hired to install the new bathtub (who presented himself as a Plumber with a biz card stating "License and Insurance / Free Estimates") connected the bathtub without mortar bed, and 2 out of the 5 legs of the bathtub floating in the air without even touching ground. Also one of the water lines near the valve was leaking (he didn't even tested it). That day I couldn't supervise his work, the guy left, and never replied my messages so I had to hire another plumber to re-do the bathtub job. I learned my lesson, I try to verify any credentials the professional claims to have, and of course the online reviews, but now this last guy who installed the vanity and faucets was not hired by me directly, but was sent by the contractor who was finishing the Tile Job (started by another contractor who left the work at the middle with no reason).

But finally, I'm starting to see the light in the tunnel :D with this project that has last months, now almost finished.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Yikes! I've come into projects after series of really bad installers like that. More often than not we have to start from scratch.

Tubs with legs have a procedure for setting them that generally involves the legs being set to the same level as the integrated skirt so all points of contact are the same (difficult on tile floors). Some don't require and some specify against a mortar bed if there are legs being used.
 
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