Is there a reinforced PVC toilet flange?

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Stephenson

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Hi All,

I continue to have the occasional split PVC flanges in a couple of rental houses - pita to notch and remove and reglue only to have the same thing happen a couple of years later ... and, yes, I try to tighten the nut appropriately - not overtightened. I don't do a lot of this type of repair, but don't want to continue to get better at it this way

These are in 4" PVC pipe in slab on grade concrete, with tile flooring, level with nearly flush mounting - nothing fancy. I don't recall thus happening with wood floors on framed construction - does the inflexible connection between the PVC and concrete contribute?

Is there a reinforced glue-in version less likely to split where the bolts secure? I see Oatey makes versions with stainless rings, but I need to glue in and simply rest the flange on the concrete slab, without bolting. Is this the usual solution? Should tapcons always used with concrete? In our area I have never seen them when I've remodeled and replaced toilets.

Appreciate your thoughts!
 
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Reach4

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Tapcons or other anchors should be used, because it is the closet flange ring that holds the toilet down. Lead anchors can also be used, but they seem harder to get aligned right, to me. When you drill for a Tapcon, make the hole deeper than the screw will reach, and blow out the dust.

You are gluing inside of 4 inch pipe. If you had plenty of outside clearance, you could use an outside compression cast iron Code Blue flange, or equiv. Those are very unlikely to break, but if they did for some reason, they would be easy to replace. There are also all-plastic inside compression 4 inch flanges, which are also easy to replace because they are not glued.
 

Jeff H Young

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I never used a PVC flange and only seen them on new builds PVC is becoming more common just saw an apartment complex with PVC DWV.
The all plastic ABS rings I hear bad talk about I've done many W/C installs with existing all ABS and my experience has been mixed but generally not as good as a metal ring. Back When I did 100 or more a year Some time used All plastic didn't like them much but dealt with it with out too much trouble . So I'd pass on them not great
 

Reach4

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I don't even know why they make PVC flanges. Or how they are allowed. It's just silly that they even exist.
They are cheaper to manufacture -- even tho it takes a complex mold, they can just melt the pellets and inject.

They could use "filled" plastic for more strength. I am not sure they don't.

Besides the potential for mechanical failure, they are thicker. I have wondered if they could be topped with a repair ring such as
Sioux Chief 886-MR at the initial installation. It may or may not be a good fit; I don't know. Maybe invert the ring from its normal orientation to minimize the thickness increase.

886-mr-1.jpg


So why even consider this? Today the Pushtite 3 inch and some inside compression flanges re only available with molded plastic rings.

I took dimensions and photos at a Home Depot long ago, and posted on that. I think the stock of those with a stainless ring has been exhausted.
http://terrylove.com/forums/index.p...ng-3x4-lead-drain-pipe-on-3-steel-pipe.60569/ post #10
I think 888-GPM (PVC) with the stainless steel ring are out of stock everywhere, but you might find a picture with stainless. I would be that if you actually ordered today, you would get all-plastic. So they kept the same model numbers, but downgraded the product.
 
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Stephenson

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Oak - so local Lowes has the apathy version with stainless ring.

I got 2 1/4” (3/16) Tapcons - is this suitable length? The 1 3/4” just seemed a bit short?
 

Reach4

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If the area below the ring is dug out, the extra length could be useful. If the extra length was not needed, it won't hurt, but will require more torque. If you got hex head, it is easier to apply torque. If you got Phillips, use good bits. I like the separate replaceable bits, and typically get DeWALT, Irwin, MilwaukeeI also have waha. You don't want the screwdriver bit camming out, and causing you to not get the screw in all of the way. I will mount the bits into a variable speed drill that has a low gear.

Be sure to drill deeper than the screw, and to blow out the dust with a cocktail straw or other slender straw.
 
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Stephenson

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I got the hex … love the way they feel building decks … one less thing to worry about!

Roger on the hole depth and blowing out!

Thank you. All!
 
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