Iron removal

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Oscarmeyer28

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Hi I have a question about iron removal. So my water hardness is 61 ppm. My iron is 3.5 ppm. I believe its a factor of 8 x 3.5 = 89 hardness. I have a culligan gold 10 series softener from 2007. I had them run my water again because I have rust stains in the bottom of my tub. New tub less than a month old. The hardness was good. But I still have .5 ppm iron passing through my softener.
They recommended I buy a new softener. So instead of dropping a couple thousand. I was looking for some suggestions. Can I buy a changeable wound filter to take it out. I have a whirlpool whole house filter after the softner that regents itself every 7 days. It has a carbon bed in it. I also have a poe sedemet filter before the softener. Can I buy a cheaper air induced filter.
I'm only going to live here for maybe 5 more years. Its only 2 people so I don't want to drop a ton of money on a new softener that isn't even that old. Any help would be much appreciated
thank you, Trevor
 

Reach4

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Try this search in this forum, and see if you can resurrect your resin:
img_3.png

Maybe replacing your resin and treating your resin periodically would get you through cheaply with some work. Maybe you could just treat your old resin. How long did the softener by itself do the job for you? Was it good for the first 5 years?

Set your softener to regenerate every 3 or 4 days. Use special iron-treating salt, and/or use Rescare or Res-up feeder.

On the other hand, a dedicated backwashing iron filter would be the right way. 3.5 ppm of iron is a lot for a softener to handle. If you own the house, and are selling, maybe that would help the house value. Maybe it would not. While there may be some who see a backwashing iron filter as a plus when buying a house, I am pretty sure they are in the minority.
 
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Bannerman

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If your hardness is 61 ppm, that then is less than 4 GRAINS hard, which is fairly low. 17.1 ppm = 1 grain.

Each 1 ppm iron is typically calculated as 5 grains equivalent hardness. Your 3.5 ppm is then equivalent to 18 grains (308 ppm) hardness in addition to 4 grains actual hardness, so at least 22 grains compensated hardness.

3.5 ppm is much more iron than recommended to be removed by a softener as a softener is inefficient at iron reduction. The regeneration frequency would need to be increased and use considerably more salt then would otherwise be efficient. Even with that, depending on the water pH, the softener resin will likely become iron fouled without regular ongoing chemical cleaning.

That amount of iron should be removed prior to the softener. There are numerous methods for iron reduction including oxidation with air, chlorine or hydrogen peroxide injection, or media filtration such as Katalox Light. A cartridge filter contains too little media to be of much benefit.

Suggest posting your water analysis results so that all water conditions can be taken into consideration before recommendations are offered.
 
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Oscarmeyer28

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OK I probably misunderstood then. I just assumed it was measured in ppm too. The culligan guy just told me my hardness was 61. With his kit it took 61 drops to change the color of the water. The iron was 3.5 ppm and he did say that in ppm. What kit do you recommend for testing my water? I have reverse osmosis for my drinking water. ....
My brother had the softener before me for his town water. Before he sold the place he gave it to me. I've only owned the house for a year. The softner was working at his house fine before he quit using it 3 years ago.
I'm guessing I'll need something like an air injection system. But with only .5 ppm passing through I didn't know if I could get away with a disposable filter for the next couple years. I'm OK with investing some money into the water as that's a vital thing but, a lot of people are not going to care if I have a $3000 system on a $30 filter after the softener. Since I already have a name brand softener.... They just care if the water tests good and is drinkable. I don't believe I'll get my money back on a $3000 system. The house is only a $95,000 house.
But if that's the concenses I get then I'll spend the money. I just find it hard to believe the culligan salesman telling me my softener is bad and I need a new one. I fully agree that 3.5 is a lot for a softener that's why I came here to try and find something else. I've seen were people say air induced clogged pipes.
 

Reach4

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You probably have 61 grains of hardness, if he was using the Hach 5-b kit. Click Inbox above.
 

ditttohead

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Agreed. A proper and complete water test is where we need to start. Three is no cartridge filet that would be recommended for that level of iron. 5 years is a long time. Definitely time to look at modernizing and updating your equipment.
 

Oscarmeyer28

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OK I'll go with a 1.5. I have a water softener that is doing its job. I tool the sample from the well no filters or softener. When the Culligan man tested my water for hardness after the softener it was good. First drop it changed color on the hach 5-b kit. Is that a good system (the link). I'm a DIY person I have fittings and stuff I just want to make sure there isn't something else about filling it or washing it with some chemical or something first.....it looks to all be there?
 

ditttohead

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I assume you have no intention of drinking this water of course. You are just using it for non potable applications correct?
 

ditttohead

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iron 2.60
Hardness 1100 mg/L; 64.3 grains
Sulfate 926 mg/L great laxative, also associated with blue baby syndrome etc. The level indicated is higher than I would recommend using for drinking, it is likely "semi safe", but since a high quality USA made RO is only a few hundred bucks, I don't see a reason to drink this water without proper treatment. Since this level is at nearly 1000 today, what was it yesterday and what will it be next month... without regular testing you need to assume some considerable fluctuations in this level will occur. http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/wells/waterquality/sulfate.html
pH 7.3
15 color units
 

Oscarmeyer28

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So the 1 cubic ft of KL system can handle up to 5.1 gpm. my shower is only 1.75 gpm. and my washer is only 2 gpm. I wont have the shower the washer and the dishwasher on all at the same time.... which even still it's around 2 gpm. That would put me a little over the flow. Would that hurt anything other than letting some untreated water through? http://www.aquascience.net/katalox-...x-48-tank-fleck-2510sxt-digital-control-valve

The other option is to go with the bigger tank and AIO oxygen chamber. I'm curious if I would need this? It's only a $200 difference but still if I don't need the bigger one I would rather save the money. http://www.aquascience.net/katalox-...t-oxygen-chamber-system-digital-control-valve

ALSO ....I have an RO system for my drinking water.
 

ditttohead

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The math does not usually work out very well on manganese dioxide based systems. There are simply too many variables for a traditional calculation to compensate for, unlike hard water and softening resin which is fairly easy to calculate. I would highly recommend a larger volume of KL or similar media. I am also not much of a fan of the AIO 2510 design. Too many failed o-ring retainer on the neck. Also many online companies tend to sell the valve with a bunch of cheap knockoff parts in order to be the lowest price, cheap risers, cheap tanks etc. AIO is ok and can work but be aware that airy water is fairly common with this design. I prefer air regen on several more modern valves by Clack and Fleck. I really prefer a simple H2o2 regen design but this is a lot more expensive.
 
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