Installing anode rode into the electric element hole. Thread FIP or?

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I'm working with a 1982 tank, still in operation, and wanting to change the anode rod. Can I use the electric element ports instead?
However, the original anode is not coming out at this point, it's too late by a decade or so.

It's a Rheem Solaride 120 tank, with two unused element ports. With:
k414-1612-3.jpg
I'd be almost there. But what about the threading? I understand the electric elements are 1" straight thread, not 1" tapered thread.
The powered anode rods are 3/4" tapered thread. Is there a way to make a proper seal?

Is brass or stainless the better material for this application?
 

Reach4

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For tapered thread, use PTFE tape. The threads cut right thru the tape, so it will still have a good electrical connection.

I like your plan, tho you would like your anode to be dangling close to the middle of the tank.

Brass is better but costs more. So I am not sure what I would use for this application. Don't use plastic. Even if the heat was not a problem, you do need conductivity.

Were you able to try a big impact wrench on the old anode? When I pulled my anode, I broke the first cheap impact wrench. Took it back and got the next size. That barely worked. And the WH I did was only maybe 14 years old.
 
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I like your plan, tho you would like your anode to be dangling close to the middle of the tank.

Were you able to try a big impact wrench on the old anode? When I pulled my anode, I broke the first cheap impact wrench. Took it back and got the next size. That barely worked. And the WH I did was only maybe 14 years old.
With a 40 year old tank, and a rusted anode rod, I did not want to risk damaging the tank removing the old anode rod.
Our local tool library has a beefy impact wrench which I use at times.

With a powered anode rod, the exact tank location matters less. Plus this is a recirculating solar tank, so the water will mix perfectly.

As long as the tapered reducer works ok in the straight thread heating element hole, I'm good to go.
 
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I was able to install electric (plug in the wall) anode rods on several tanks.
I completely ignored the old anode rods which on these ancient tanks are completely rusted,
and selected a different port. For example on a State water heater using a stainless steel reducer:
k414-3212-3.jpg

In one case I replaced the bottom of tank drain with the anode rode, on the theory that nobody flushed it in 40 years of operation, why would they start doing so now?

If anyone's aware of a combination anode rode/drain valve though, I'm all eyes.
 

wwhitney

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If anyone's aware of a combination anode rode/drain valve though, I'm all eyes.
If the increased offset from the interior of the tank would not be a problem for the electric anode (I'm not familiar with them), you could just put a brass street-tee into the drain valve female inlet. Then the electric anode goes in the straight inlet, and the drain valve goes in the side inlet.

Cheers, Wayne
 
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