For installing a new floating toilet is it easier to work from below when dealing with the old drain

Users who are viewing this thread

Mini Me

Member
Messages
295
Reaction score
10
Points
18
Location
Toronto
Consider you have the layout in the first picture and consider that I want to replace the upstairs toilet with a floating one. For that to happen the plumber will have to do something with the drain for the old toilet and then cut the main stack (the blueish big vertical pipe) and connect the drain for the new toilet somewhere there.

Right now I am renovating the downstairs bathroom. I just realized that the plumber who will do the upstairs work might need to work from below to do a better job. You can see what it looks like from below in the second picture. The drain that needs to be removed is connected to the main stack just above the 10" mark on the tape, you can guess it there. What is the standard procedure in these situations what does the plumber do with the old toilet drain and when should I call the guy?

It might be too early from the upstairs bathroom perspective since I have not started the work there and I have not removed the horrible subway tiles that I currently have there. Do I have to call the plumber now? I would prefer not to but I am asking just because this is the last moment when I can still do that and allow him to work from below if he has to



 

Tuttles Revenge

In the Trades
Messages
2,167
Reaction score
634
Points
113
Yes, it looks like the connection to the stack and re-routing of the sink drain will need to be done from below.

A couple pointers for picking out your carrier and toilet. The toilet cantilevers its weight against the wall at the bottom of the toilet so that the wall surface needs to come into contact with the fame of the carrier in the wall in order not to ruin the finished wall. Select a toilet that the bottom where it contacts the wall will bear its weight or point of contact against the frame of the carrier itself or install some other imovable object to brace against.

We just had a client whose 2 wall hung toilets crushed through the tile wall because there was nothing in the wall to support the weight.
 

Mini Me

Member
Messages
295
Reaction score
10
Points
18
Location
Toronto
Hmm good points thank you
I thought that was the entire idea of providing the metal frame that surrounds the water tank. Am I missing anything here ? I am not sure what I need to look for when I buy it

img-duofix-wc-element-ghost-behind-wall-8-11.jpg
 

Mini Me

Member
Messages
295
Reaction score
10
Points
18
Location
Toronto
BTW you are not very clear when you are saying rerouting
Are thy going to reuse the existing drain? Because I am OK to open the floor above, that bathroom will be gutted out as well and the plumber can work from above
 

Tuttles Revenge

In the Trades
Messages
2,167
Reaction score
634
Points
113
Every plumber will have a different specific idea of how they plan and execute their work. They will likely reuse the existing drain, but the location of the fittings might not work to work from above. The 2" drain could be left as is since it ties in under the toilet trap arm. Maybe there is enough pipe up top to get to the right spot for the carrier.. But if the center of the drain stack doesn't line up with the carrier, a lot of the stack might need to be routed to match. Just depends on the site conditions and location of the carrier.

In the picture you posted, you can see the horizontal cross bar at the bottom of the toilet. Some, and probably only a very small number of toilets are not long enough to reach that bar. So their cantelevered weight pushes against the wall/tile above that bar and eventually crushes through the wall.

Some carriers have a vertical bar next to the drain which any toilet would fit. I think the versions made for 2x4 walls have the vertical supports near the drain, but you can't offset the drain with those. The 2x6 versions (the one you posted) the drain fitting mounts atop that horizontal bar

Lots to choose from. Geberit lists all the toilets that they have fitted to their carriers. All the other manufactures that I've talked to will only guarantee that their brand toilets will fit their toilets. But I believe they're universal fit. Just some may need modification to work together like added blocking to prevent wall crushing.

Wall Carriers.jpg
 

Mini Me

Member
Messages
295
Reaction score
10
Points
18
Location
Toronto
I think I got it.
So you are saying that in this design the drain might prevent the manufacturer to properly support the floating toilet at the back bottom side because the drain is there .From what you are saying the ones made to work with 6" framing are in a better shape because the drain can be offset.
I guess I could add 6" framing only for that small section of the wall and have the wall protuding in that small area.

Re re routing the drain to use the old drain ...would it be possible for the pmumber to go down and then back with to connect to the old drain?
 

Tuttles Revenge

In the Trades
Messages
2,167
Reaction score
634
Points
113
I'm saying is that you should research which toilet you want to use and make sure it fits the carrier properly. simple measurements of the spec sheets. The 2x6 versions allow some offset in the drain if needed.. but you don't know now if you do. its just an option.
 
Top