Fixing nail hole in sewage pipe--very difficult spot. Thoughts?

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TOTOshopper

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Hello, sort of weird issue. My home is a wood-frame on slab with stucco walls. The water and sewage pipes go down into the slab. The sewage pipes are black ABS plastic. One day I noticed water coming from under the weep screed (the metal flashing at the bottom of the stucco) on the side of the house.

Below the weep screed, I could see that a sewage pipe emedded in the slab, but with one side just barely visible. This sewage pipe only services ONE upstairs toilet and nothing else, and a bit of water leaked out whenever we flushed the toilet. (Yeah, pretty gross. We immediately stopped using that toilet to prevent further water damage and to avoid contamination.)

I cut a hole in the wall where the leak was. When they were constructing the house, the bottom of the weep screed was nailed to the slab and very unfortunately, whoever was putting in the nails put on directly into the black ABS sewage pipe. And this didn’t leak for many years because the nail was blocking the hole. But then eventually the nail sufficiently rusted away for it to start leaking.

I know the recommended way to fix a hole in an ABS sewage pipe is to cut out that section and join in a new section. But the hole is just right where the pipe goes into the slab, so I don’t see any vertical room to do that. (And also the pipe is right against the weep screed there, so there isn’t horizontal room for a joint either.) Obviously jackhammering away at the slab right were it supports an outside load-bearing two story wall is not a real option.

Since this is just a small nail hole, what are the prospects of being able to permanently patch it with epoxy or something like that?

After fixing this, we will need to have a new section of weep screed put back over it and then the wall needs to fixed an painted. This will be expensive, and so we don’t want to have our patch fail and need to open this up and repeat it in 5 or 10 years.

Are there any epoxies that are more or less permanent (will last the life of the ABS pipe)?
Or any other suggestions on how to approach this problem?

All suggestions or ideas are welcomed! Thanks!
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Here is a picture of the hole, I am holding up the tarpaper. This is before I cut away the weep screed. You can see the nailhead (with some kind of white tape around it) there in the weep screed. That is where the leak is.

20230414_125815.jpg



Here the weep screed has been cut and pulled back to expose the section of black ABS sewage pipe behind it. You can see the nail hole. This is the leak I need to fix. You can also see the pipe going into the concrete slab an inch or two below the leak.

20230418_111034.jpg
 

Reach4

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1. It is not that clear to me. Is the hole maybe 3/16 inch diameter, or is it much larger. It looks to me as if your index finger is pointing to a much larger hole in the pipe.

2. If you cut an ABS repair coupling in half roughly (so you would view a semicircle from end on), could you position that over the hole? I am thinking that you could glue that into place with ABS cement, and hold that firmly in postion until the cement has completely set. Bind the coupling half to the pipe somehow. Maybe use a worm-gear radiator clamp (best). Maybe wraps of fishing line.

I am not a plumber.
 

TOTOshopper

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1. It is not that clear to me. Is the hole maybe 3/16 inch diameter, or is it much larger. It looks to me as if your index finger is pointing to a much larger hole in the pipe.

2. If you cut an ABS repair coupling in half roughly (so you would view a semicircle from end on), could you position that over the hole? I am thinking that you could glue that into place with ABS cement, and hold that firmly in postion until the cement has completely set. Bind the coupling half to the pipe somehow. Maybe use a worm-gear radiator clamp (best). Maybe wraps of fishing line.

I am not a plumber.

It's hard to see in the pictures. In the first picture--the one where I am pointing, the hole is still covered by the weep screed--you can see the nailhead on the weepscreed, that is where the hole is.
In the second picture, you can see where the water is leaking out. And it is smaller than it looks in the picture.

What I ended up doing: First I squeezed a bead of E6000 glue out of the tube and used a toothpick to work it into the actual hole. This actually stopped the leak, but It was just a temporary measure.

My permanent fix ended up being just want you suggest: I bought a coupling from Home Depot and cut out a piece out of one end that would cover about a 1/4th section of the pipe (I'd have to have chiseled away more of the wall to use a larger section). I roughed up the pipe and the inside of my coupling "patch" piece with a steel brush. Then cleaned both surfaces thoroughly with rubbing alcohol. Next I applied ABS glue liberally to both the pipe and the patch piece. I stuck it on and held it in place (had to do this manually unfortunately) for 15 minutes. After several hours, I applied a coating of more ABS clue all around the edges.

I hope it works. We will use the heck out of the toilet and see if it leaks before we close up the wall. I'll also maybe add a few coats of glue just because I can.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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1. It is not that clear to me. Is the hole maybe 3/16 inch diameter, or is it much larger. It looks to me as if your index finger is pointing to a much larger hole in the pipe.

2. If you cut an ABS repair coupling in half roughly (so you would view a semicircle from end on), could you position that over the hole? I am thinking that you could glue that into place with ABS cement, and hold that firmly in postion until the cement has completely set. Bind the coupling half to the pipe somehow. Maybe use a worm-gear radiator clamp (best). Maybe wraps of fishing line.

I am not a plumber.

Repair coupling section glued over the hole with the worm drive clamp X2
 
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