Dropped some cut PVC into basement floor drain

Discussion in 'Drain Cleaning' started by nwoodard34, May 11, 2021.

  1. nwoodard34

    nwoodard34 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Location:
    Virginia
    So I was installing a flush pipe from my spin down filter into the basement floor drain this weekend and cut off a piece of PVC for the job. Due to my carelessness, the little piece I cut off rolled down into the drain.

    This would be annoying but not terribly embarrassing. It happens right?

    Well, if I am not the most careless person in the world, I don't know who is, because as I was finishing it up today I cut off another small piece and...you guessed it...kerplunk it went right down into the drain right behind its friend.

    Yes I am ashamed. Feel free to publicly flog me for being a dumb dumb.

    That said, I obviously need to figure out how to get these out as it is now mostly clogged (verrrrryyyy slow draining). The floor drain pipe is 2.5" PVC and the pieces I dropped in were 3/4" PVC each less than 1.5" long. It is about 10' from the main stack for the house, which is 3" PVC. We are on a septic if that matters.

    Is the best play to use a snake and try to unjam them from the trap and let water carry them to the main? Get an auger and try to pull them back or bust them up (while somehow not destroying the PVC pipe itself)?

    Please help once you are done laughing and feeling sorry for me. Thanks!
     
  2. Sylvan

    Sylvan Still learning

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Occupation:
    plumbing - fire suppression - boiler inspector
    Location:
    New York
    Most powerful WET Dry you can find
     
    Terry likes this.
  3. Sponsor

    Sponsor Paid Advertisement

     
    Terry likes this.
  4. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Start with a wet-dry vacuum cleaner. Maybe that sucks out the pieces. Maybe it just sucks out the water, and you will be able to see a piece to snag.

    Does this floor drain have a cleanout plug on the side of the bowl, as many floor drains do?
     
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    That's what I would try too. With the vac, you can improve suction by closing off the area around the hose so that it's pulling as well as it can from the pipe below.
     
    Sylvan likes this.
  6. nwoodard34

    nwoodard34 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Location:
    Virginia
    Alright guys yeah the shop vac was the right answer. Sucked them right out. Thanks for the help. To show my appreciation here is a pic of the pieces as well as my final result

    20210511_192107.jpg

    20210511_192849.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 12, 2021
  7. nwoodard34

    nwoodard34 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Location:
    Virginia
    Side note the PVC pieces weren't what was clogging up the drain. It still backs up if I open the spin down valve more than halfway and takes a while to drain back down.

    Reach4 has mentioned a clean out plug attached. I am having trouble visualizing what that would look like for a floor drain but I don't believe there is one. Does that mean I can't snake it because of the trap? Maybe just plunge it really hard or reverse the shop vac to blow whatever is in there on down the pipe?
     
  8. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2013
    Location:
    IL
    Like this:
    [​IMG]
    You could try a Brasscraft drain bladder or equivalent. Maybe a medium or small.

    I would try running my RIDGID PowerSpin Plus #57043 snake, rotated by my variable speed reversible electric drill, down the drain. I ran through my lavatory drain, through the 1-1/4 trap, and took out the clog that was maybe 10 ft down. That snake is small and should pass through the floor cast iron drain trap as it rotates. However it might just pass thru through the clog too, and the clog can close behind it. So bigger is better, but that unit worked better than I expected for me.
     
  9. Matticus

    Matticus New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2021
    Location:
    Canandaigua, NY
    I've used some pneumatic grabbers from Picote. Also used a shopvac. Good job getting the pipe out of there!
     
  10. nwoodard34

    nwoodard34 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2015
    Location:
    Virginia
    Nice ok, that makes sense but unfortunately my drain doesn't have the cleanout line. Wish it did though! I'll give the drain bladder a try. Appreciate the advice.
     
  11. Bannerman

    Bannerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    You said this is a basement floor drain and also mentioned a septic system. A septic tank is usually not buried deep below ground level so the waste line that exits the home will be typically ~3-4' above the basement floor. Unless your basement is a walkout style with the septic tank located in the lower area outside the walkout section, I anticipate the basement floor drain will not discharge to the septic tank.

    Your floor drain maybe discharging to a separate dry well or it could flow to a sump pit or similar that incorporates a sump pump to pump the drain water up to the waste line that flows into the septic tank.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2021
Similar Threads: Dropped basement
Forum Title Date
Drain Cleaning Dropped plastic handle for auger down the washing machine drain pipe Aug 15, 2013
Drain Cleaning 3" cut off wheel dropped down 4" pipe, cant get it out-help! Apr 2, 2011
Drain Cleaning Dropped dremel cutter down toilet drain Sep 8, 2009
Drain Cleaning Basement below septic with no sump wont drain. Oct 9, 2019
Drain Cleaning Basement drain clogged? Feb 11, 2019

Share This Page