Copper water supply line

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Cscjjd

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Hello,

I will be replacing part of my home's underground water supply line and I have a few questions...
1. Will I be able to sweat a new fitting onto the 3/4" copper going into the home using a propane torch (to replace the compression coupling in the photo below) ? I am wondering if the soil will be such a heat sink that I will not be able to heat the pipe sufficiently with a propane torch?
CIMG3105smallb.JPG


2. Would a brass compression fitting be a suitable option instead of a sweated fitting?
1645817441460.png

3. I would like to replace the 3 year old cutoff valve that already has corrosion issues. Would a full port PVC ball valve be OK?
1645817118463.png
CIMG3131small.JPG





Thanks!
 

John Gayewski

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You can't solder underground copper. Not because it won't solder, it's because a solder joint isnt a weld or mechanical joint. Brazing is a type of weld.

You need tio flare it and use flare fittings. These are a bit specialized. Call a plumber to get you up out of the ground.
 

Cscjjd

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I am not sure I used the correct term. This part of the supply line is under a concrete meter box which is embedded in the concrete driveway. Is this still considered underground? Thanks.
CIMG3127small.JPG
 

John Gayewski

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I am not sure I used the correct term. This part of the supply line is under a concrete meter box which is embedded in the concrete driveway. Is this still considered underground? Thanks.
View attachment 81451
Yeah. Ground movement is why a solder joint isnt kosher.

Still need flaring tools or brazing rod and flux for dissimilar metals.
 

Plant.One

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If I understand correctly, SharkBite fittings would only be OK if I decide to use PEX for the replacement pipe?
push to connect fittings (sharkbite is a brand name) are good for copper or pex.


Could you please expand on this - what is the drawback to this type of valve?

Thanks!
on my expierence - those valves dont age well at standard room temps. they bind up, and in general fail over time, significantly sooner than a brass valve will anyway. just install a good quarter turn valve in there.

pex with metal valve is a much more suitable replacement, and will be much simpler to install/repair due to its flexibility and your confined space you're working in IMHO
 

Mr tee

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I wouldn't use a PVC ball valve, and I wouldn't use a brass one unless it had a stainless steel handle - the plated steel ones corrode and can fail in moist locations.
 

Cscjjd

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I wouldn't use a PVC ball valve, and I wouldn't use a brass one unless it had a stainless steel handle - the plated steel ones corrode and can fail in moist locations.
Thanks Mr. tee - I think that's what happening with the valve that's in there now.
 
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