Cast Iron to PVC???

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by SYakoban, Apr 14, 2019 at 12:32 PM.

  1. SYakoban

    SYakoban New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Hi Guys,

    [​IMG]

    I want to fill in this waste pipe well in my basement by extending the cleanouts upwards to floor level with PVC and then filling the well with gravel and topping with concrete. If you look at the photo, the left of the photo shows the whole house vent, then there is a trap with two caps, then a wye at the right before the waste pipe exits the basement. The cast iron is a 3" waste pipe, but it looks like the wye cleanout has a 4" bell.

    What I'm trying to understand is what kind of adapter is available to transition from the cast iron to PVC using these fittings. I don't want to cut any cast iron, just remove the caps and adapt to the ends where the cap would go.

    Possible? How exactly?

    Thank you!
     
  2. Sylvan

    Sylvan Still learning

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Occupation:
    plumbing- - fire suppression
    Location:
    New York
    The Vent before the trap could be a fresh air inlet not the whole house vent
    Depending on the condition of the CO threads you maybe able to threat a 4" galvanized nipple and then go to NO hub coupling to PVC
     
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  4. SYakoban

    SYakoban New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    New Jersey
    The cleanout cap threads are gone. The lead plug has to be hammered in each time.

    It looks to me like the threaded portion is set in the bell end with lead (not sure?). So is there a way to either remove that or somehow connect even with bad threads?
     
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    You have a poured lead joint, which can be removed and replaced. You might find an old school plumber that does lead and oakum poured joints, or you can also use a rubber insert made for cast hub joints and run PVC from there.
    Removing the lead joint normally means drilling, prying, maybe even a little saw blade work to work the lead out of there.
     
  6. SYakoban

    SYakoban New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Thanks Terry is there a name for the rubber insert?
     
  7. Sylvan

    Sylvan Still learning

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Occupation:
    plumbing- - fire suppression
    Location:
    New York
    Yo I resemble this remark

    "You have a poured lead joint, which can be removed and replaced. You might find an old school plumber that does lead and oakum poured joints"

    The reason I Still used lead and oakum especially on roof drains is as follows

    The roof can be extremely hot in the dog days of summer and below freezing in the winter and rubber / [plastic can dry out or crack

    Bird dropping are acidic and lead is impervious to acid and will expand and contract with the temperature changes

    Poured joints are proven to have longevity well over 100 years of service

    Picture a guy walks walks onto a roof with a rag and uses some primer and glue and attaches a plastic roof drain and says that will be $1,200 fore the installation do you think the building owner will not gripe after seeing how it was installed?
     

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  8. SYakoban

    SYakoban New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    New Jersey
    So how does a PVS stub attach to a cast iron fitting with lead?
     
  9. Michael Young

    Michael Young Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2016
    Location:
    North Carolina
    SV SERVICE SEAL GASKET, available at Fergusons. One side fits into the hub. They make an adapter for the other side. a lot of plumbers will tell you that you don't need the adapter. They are wrong. Buy the adapter and some of the lube they mfg. just for this purpose. Work the rubber into the hub. Work your adapter into the seal the best you can by hand. Put a piece of wood against the plastic adapter and use a mini sledge to (gently) work the seal into the adapter. Once the adapter it installed, you're golden. Just glue like you would any other pvc fitting.

    upload_2019-4-14_22-42-29.png
     
  10. SYakoban

    SYakoban New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    New Jersey
    @Michael Young - good explanation - thank you. I think you're saying that I need the SV SERVICE SEAL GASKET plus an adapter. What is the adapter called?

    Also, in my cleanout, am I right that the threaded piece that the cap fits into is leaded into the fitting hub and that piece needs to be removed to get the gasket to fit the hub?
     
  11. Michael Young

    Michael Young Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2016
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I use a torch. Heat up the lead and slowly work out enough lead. Eventually you'll reach a point where you can pull the lead and oakum out with your channel locks; a big flat screwdriver (one of your junkers) is helpful too. Take a little fan with you. it's going to get stinky. Then just clean the joint and install a new service gasket and adapter (just ask the guy at fergusons for the adapter).

    upload_2019-4-17_21-21-24.png
     
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