Basement rough-in with pump

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Kevin5656

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Hi everyone. Was just looking for some guidance and feedback on a basement rough in. Planning to install a sewage pump in the basement and figured I would add a half bath while I have everything opened up.

Pump is going into the corner of the basement and will be tied into a clean out that is 8’ off the ground.

First connection will be to split off and connect two 2” floor drains. One is going into the boiler room, and second will be near the pump. First question is that the floor drain to the boiler room is about 14’ away. Would I need a vent to tap into this line? Or would it suffice since it’s just a floor drain?

Next connection to the main line will be another wye for the bathroom sink to tap into. Does this layout work to also serve as a vent for the toilet? The vent line from the sink will downgrade to 1.5” and will connect back to the vent line from the sewage pump.

Hope the drawings help to show the layout I was planning. I would welcome any suggestions or recommendations. Thank you in advance!

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Breplum

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Vents must roll up at min. 45 degrees. You may regret not having purchased a duplex pump system. We never do single pumps systems.
For underslab, I highly recommend hiring a licensed pro to do the work. Once you make one critical mistake under a slab you won't know it until you end up regretting it.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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In the most technical reading of NYS code... Horizontal wet venting is for use in bathrooms which are defined as having a tub or shower.. however, we (seattle) plumb powder rooms the way you have them drawn as they consist of the same fixtures, just without a tub/shower.. An emergency floor drain could be included in that horizontal wet vent too so long as its in that room.

The floor drains each need vents and the vents must extend vertically to a point no less than 6" above the flood level of that fixture.. ie 6" above the floor. As Jeff points out they also need trap primers to keep the trap seals full.
 

Kevin5656

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mechnical room floor drain needs vent and a trap primer.
Copy that. Thank you! Will look into adding a trap primer for both floor drains.
Due to the distance of the mechanical room from the existing vent lines, do you believe an AAV would be sufficient? If I had it come up the corner of the boiler room to a few feet off the ground.
 

Kevin5656

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Vents must roll up at min. 45 degrees. You may regret not having purchased a duplex pump system. We never do single pumps systems.
For underslab, I highly recommend hiring a licensed pro to do the work. Once you make one critical mistake under a slab you won't know it until you end up regretting it.
Duplex system was a bit out of budget but I had explored it as an option. Thankfully the basement has never seen water in 30 years, but adding the drains just as a precaution since anything can happen.
I am definitely leaning towards having a plumber come to lay down the rough in now.

But thank you for taking the time and sharing the wisdom!
 

Kevin5656

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In the most technical reading of NYS code... Horizontal wet venting is for use in bathrooms which are defined as having a tub or shower.. however, we (seattle) plumb powder rooms the way you have them drawn as they consist of the same fixtures, just without a tub/shower.. An emergency floor drain could be included in that horizontal wet vent too so long as its in that room.

The floor drains each need vents and the vents must extend vertically to a point no less than 6" above the flood level of that fixture.. ie 6" above the floor. As Jeff points out they also need trap primers to keep the trap seals full.
Will take the guidance on the trap primers and factor that in when setting up the rough in with the plumber. Would the floor drain that’s 2-3 feet away from the main line still need a separate drain? It would be in the bathroom area
 

Jeff H Young

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Shouldnt be a deal breaker adding a vent in a mechanical room basement. might need 2 vents can share drain line though.
on residential basement floor drains trap primers required I know going back more years than i care to remember they were required by code but often were ignored . people pour water down once a month or so , not suggesting you omit primers though.
Additionaly you definately need at least one vent to atmoshere an aav is ok on the floor drains but the pit really needs a real vent.
I think you can DIY this job
 

Kevin5656

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Shouldnt be a deal breaker adding a vent in a mechanical room basement. might need 2 vents can share drain line though.
on residential basement floor drains trap primers required I know going back more years than i care to remember they were required by code but often were ignored . people pour water down once a month or so , not suggesting you omit primers though.
Additionaly you definately need at least one vent to atmoshere an aav is ok on the floor drains but the pit really needs a real vent.
I think you can DIY this job
Thank you for the guidance. Yes will definitely install a trap primer for both floor drains. The floor drain in the mechanical room will end up having a AAV, the floor drain by the pump will have a vent that connects to the vent from the pump. That vent will tie into a dry vent that goes up to the roof. I just have to map out the vent lines now for the sink and floor drain to tie into the pump’s dry vent.
 

Tuttles Revenge

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Will take the guidance on the trap primers and factor that in when setting up the rough in with the plumber. Would the floor drain that’s 2-3 feet away from the main line still need a separate drain? It would be in the bathroom area
Every trap requires a vent. If its not in the bathroom as part of that group, then technically it needs its own vent.

Trap primers are becoming obsolete.

2" SureSeal Inline Floor Drain Trap Seal (SS2009V)​

So long as the conTRAPtion he's using will accept a mechanical seal and as long as its code approved for their area.. not everywhere accepts mechanical seals. Those look like Sioux Chief Weldone... its got a mechanical floating backwater device.. so not sure it will accpet a trap seal. However it does come equipped with a 1/2 threaded port for a trap primer..
 

Kevin5656

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Every trap requires a vent. If its not in the bathroom as part of that group, then technically it needs its own vent.


So long as the conTRAPtion he's using will accept a mechanical seal and as long as its code approved for their area.. not everywhere accepts mechanical seals. Those look like Sioux Chief Weldone... its got a mechanical floating backwater device.. so not sure it will accpet a trap seal. However it does come equipped with a 1/2 threaded port for a trap primer..
Thanks for the input. I’ll end up having a vent for both floor drains. The one in the mechanical room will vent to an AAV. The one near the pump will just tap into the vent line coming out of the pump - since this will be a dry vent that does up to the roof.
Yes the first floor drain I picked up is a Sioux Chief, this one doesn’t have a floating device within. but yes has the 1/2 threaded port for the primer.
I’m reading reviews from various trap primers and comparing to trap seals and I guess the feedback is all over the place for both types.
 

Kevin5656

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Based on the input, here’s how I was planning on mapping out the vent lines. Any issues?

Toilet will have a 2” wet vent that connects to the bath sink line. After the sanitary tee to the sink, should I keep this 2” or can I downgrade to 1.5” for the vent?

The floor drain next to the pump will have a 1.5” vent that will connect with the pump’s vent. This will also have the sink’s vent line tap into it.

The floor drain in the mechanical room will have a vent that will branch off and rise up about 18” with an AAV. Is the location of this vent line okay? Or does it need to move down the line a bit? If I move it down, then I would just end up tapping the vent into the pump’s vent line.

Question - am I correct when using a Wye to branch off the vents for the floor drains? All other locations where the vent line rolls up to vertical will be 2-45 elbows.
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Thank you again everyone!
 
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