Hopefully basic question on creating plumbing for softener

Discussion in 'Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and r' started by 606zpx, Jul 10, 2010.

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  1. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    You sound like someone extolling the supposed but fake benefits of OBAMA healthcare. There's no health concerns in this application of PVC.

    Many Americans with their own well, pools, pool filters water softeners/filters, irrigation etc. have used PVC outside in direct sunlight all over this country for decades without the problems you say the code is based on.

    Those are demonstrable facts that fly in the face of the code and why millions of people disregard the code.

    BTW, this application of PVC to install a softener with is to be inside his pool house, out of the sun.

    I'll bet there is other PVC in there already or will be if he is just now building the pool house.

    As so far as enforcement of the code.... Those people I describe above, they are township supervisors, local government officials/folks and the general population using PVC in direct sunlight without problems or enforcement of the code. That is because It is very inexpensive, very long term durable, is easy to install and it looks nice unless some dummy uses the purple primer most codes require to be slopped on it.... (I've never used it I used clear cleaner and cement).

    Yeah I hear ya, not political!! (wink wink) but millions of Americans are finally waking up to realize they don't need all this big brother safety and property protection "we know best" hand holding in all facets of their lives whether it be by codes or laws or regulations. For some silly reason they think it is a loss of individual freedom issue.

    Yeah I hear ya!! (wink wink)

    Maybe they should get out of the office and test real world longevity etc. results.

    No arguing, just a simple and logical common sense based discussion with a good buddy but, I find most plumbers won't get in to a discussion. They simply wave the code book and pretend it has the importance of the Bible, Koran, Torah etc., and there is no doubt in my mind that it does have that importance to licensed plumbers.
  2. Akpsdvan

    Akpsdvan In the Trades

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    So what happens to the person when they go to sell a house that has had owner work done that is not to code? Will the bank finance the place? or will the person have to finance the place on their own?

    Would they need to have some one come in and redo the work to code for the bank to back the note?
  3. nhmaster3015

    nhmaster3015 Master Plumber

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    Here is why I respect and follow the code:

    Years ago, I was like you. I hated codes and I hated inspectors even more. What in hell do those little weasels know I thought. I'm the guy out here doing the work. I'm the guy with the Masters license. Who gives a crap what some jumped up little Hitler that was probably appointed the job by his Uncle has to say. Then one evening I had to attend a code seminar. Something they make us do every year to keep up our license. They call it continuing education. To me it was yet another waste of my time and money to have to sit for 3 hours and listen to a bunch of crap I already knew. The state guy giving the class's name was Leo. Leo Larochelle. Leo had been a state inspector for 20 years or so and in the plumbing trade his whole life. Ii think he was in his mid 60's at the time. Leo started the class by tossing a copy of the IPC across the room. It hit the back wall with a smack and settled to the floor. " What a pile of shit this is " he said. We all laughed and agreed with him. Leo was not a fan of the new IPC having worked under the old BOCA code, he felt the new code was way too lenient. After all, it allowed for wet venting, something that at the time most of us felt was the epitome of hack plumbing practice. "But" he continued. " It is the code and it is the law. do you know why we have codes?" he asked. He got a few wise assed replies and then explained the purpose of the code book in a manner that I have remembered since that day.
    "The code is not there to protect the public. It is not written to protect the health and safety of the nation. It is written to protect the plumber. If you follow the code to the letter there is no way that if you are ever sued in a court of law that you can be held liable for damages or injury caused." " If you pull the permit and get the required inspections and your work is passed by a certified inspector then you have fulfilled your obligation in the eyes of the law"

    So it turns out that following the code also protects the consumer and the health and safety of the nation as well.

    I really don't care how you feel about codes, permits and inspections. Because you are not a licensed plumber I can not expect you to have the same respect for the law that the rest of us that are licensed do. We all, to a man worked damn hard for our licenses . We put in the schooling and the man hours necessary to earn it. And the learning never stops. Materials and methods change and so do the codes. we are kind of like cops. It's not our job to decide which codes we like and don't like. Because if we fail to adhere to any one of them we are held liable. That thousands of folks have illegally run PVC is of no concern to me anymore than the thousands that ignore speed limits and traffic laws. You are certainly within your rights to express your opinions but when you advise folks to do things that are against the code than we have an obligation to point out your error.
  4. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Although this isn't and hasn't been about you, and you have made it about me, I hope you feel better now.

    I don't hate codes, I have a problem with some codes concerning the installation of water treatment equipment. And although I have not said it here, for years I have been saying that codes are mostly to keep the trades person straight; like your Leo said.

    In this case I don't see why you are involved. You aren't the plumber doing the installation so you have no liability in what I suggested or said I would do or use if it were mine. I too have no liability and IMO no need to say what is or is not "code". And my suggestions etc. are not an error.

    The OP can make his own decision as to the code and if he is going to follow it or not, it's not up to you other than to say it isn't code if you choose to.

    If he does not follow code and sells his house and a house inspector marks up the PVC to/from the softener in his pool house, if I were him, I'd say no problem and tell the buyer the PVC and softener have never had a problem in the x years since I installed it. He can accept it as is or.. I will remove the PVC and softener and he can install his own softener anyway and with any material he wants to or he can not buy the house.

    Banks do not get involved with anything like this, they get an appraisal a to the value/condition of the house.

    I've sold a couple houses as is. And I've told a few thousand people the above over the years. Usually the buyer sees the common sense in the comments and goes along. They can always remove the problem later.
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2010
  5. nhmaster3015

    nhmaster3015 Master Plumber

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    So, though it's not about me? how about if someone had told him to run it with garden hose. would that be OK too? After all, it would be quick and fast. It would work. and hey, who cares if it's not to code right? Give me a break.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 13, 2010
  6. Doherty Plumbing

    Doherty Plumbing Journeyman & Gas Fitter

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    Exactly. He's not a plumber so I can't imagine why he's arguing plumbing code.

    And like you said, us licensed PROFESSIONAL plumbers are held to a higher standard then joe-hack-jobs out there doing shotty work. They have nothing to lose, but we do.

    And I would NOT argue that code clauses are designed to keep professional in business. That's just silly to say that.

    Each code clause in every single code book is in there for a different reason. Some are there to protect you, some to protect others, some to protect the city and some to protect insurance companies from having to pay out on claims left right and center because there is a bunch of none-code, and therefor non certified, methods of throwing plumbing togeather.

    Will 1" PVC work. Ofcourse it will. But that doesn't mean it's the best solution to the problem, or even a good one.
  7. nhmaster3015

    nhmaster3015 Master Plumber

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    Thanks, certainly not the first time we have run up against that attitude. Without codes we would revert to whatever anyone felt like doing or using at the time and naturally, 90% of the time that would be the cheapest, easiest thing or materials possible. We protect the health and safety of the public. I know that sounds kind of hokey and maybe even a bit self serving but thanks to modern plumbing practice an good many diseases and injuries just don't happen much anymore and I damn sure don't want to see those times return. A mans home is not his castle. Most of the time it is the banks castle but even so, since the founding we have been a nation of laws and it's those laws that serve the majority, not some hack that wants to do whatever he damn well pleases.
  8. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    Location. 2.7.1
    PVC piping shall be installed only outside the foundation of any building or structure or parts thereof. It shall be buried in the ground for its entire length except vertical piping may be extended above grade per Section 2.4.4. It shall not be installed within or under any building or structure or mobile home or commercial coach or parts thereof. The term "building or structure or parts thereof" shall include structures such as porches and steps, whether roofed or not, roofed porte-cocheres, roofed patios, carports, covered walks, covered driveways and similar structures or appurtenances. [UPC..604.0]

    Exposed Piping. 2.4.4
    Vertical piping may extend a maximum of 24 in. (610 mm) above grade when located on the exterior of the building or .structure and protected from mechanical damage to the satisfaction of the
    Administrative Authority. Where exposed to sunlight, the pipe shall be wrapped with at least 0.040 in. (1.0 mm) of tape or otherwise protected from UV degradation.

    Last edited: Jul 14, 2010
  9. 606zpx

    606zpx New Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Savannah GA
    Talked the county inspector who does plumbing inspection.

    He stated my plan was fine except to ensure to insulate against freeze damage.

    Maybe I need to clarify situation.

    My house is on a crawl space. The copper comes from the ground up into the crawl space and is elevated along the support beams.

    The following plan is allowable per inspector:

    1. Tie into the house 3/4 main supply prior to where it first branches (actually it will be after the first branch which is to a spigot that does not need softening).

    2. Will leave a direct copper line in place with valve in case I need to bypass the loop (sharkbite). Will use sharkbite t's and put a sharkbite valve on each leg just in case there is a problem in the loop.

    3. Run 1" PVC elevated along support structures proceeding under my deck, still elevated and supported, then directly into the pump house. Will do this for both legs.

    4. Insulate the PVC for entire length. At no point is PVC exposed to UV or unprotected otherwise. Note that when I bought the house the pool pumps were exposed and the piping is 2" PVC that was partially exposed. Put pump house up subsequently.

    I appreciate the help and the discourse was helpful as it spurred me to call my local agent.

    If I happen to have a problem with the PVC loop it can be isolated with the valves and house service will be uninterrupted.
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2010
  10. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    Then you're good to go. He's the guy you have to please.
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Even Georgia freezes. Running water piping, even insulated, as you indicate is asking for problems. Good luck.
  12. nukeman

    nukeman Nuclear Engineer

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    Location:
    VA
    Sounds like you got it covered. Here's some info that might be helpful in the fututre:

    - GA Amendments to IPC (hardly anything changed): http://www.dca.state.ga.us/developm...ams/documents/IPC2010Amendments_effective.pdf

    IPC allows the following for Water Service Pipe:
    1. Abs
    2. Asbestos-cement
    3. CPVC
    4. Brass
    5. Copper
    6. Several flavors of PEX
    7. Ductile iron
    8. Galvanized
    9. PB
    10. PE (several flavors)
    11. PP
    12. PVC
    13. SS

    However, only the following is allowed for Water Distribution Pipe:
    1. CPVC
    2. Brass
    3. Copper
    4. Several flavors of PEX
    5. Galvanized
    6. PB
    10. PE (only PE-AL-PE)
    11. PP
    12. SS

    So no PVC or PE (except of the composite PE listed). I have seen nothing directly in IPC about PVC (or other materials) being outside/exposed to sun. However, they define the "Water Service Pipe" as being underground and outside of the structure. If the material is not allowed to be a "Water Distribution Pipe", then the "Water Service Pipe" must terminate at/before the full open valve located at the entrance to the structure.

    In addition to PVC not be listed as a "water distribution pipe", there is an additional restriction for hot water that says that the pipe must have a pressure rating of at least 100 psi at 180F (which PVC would fail that test as well).
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2010
  13. nhmaster3015

    nhmaster3015 Master Plumber

    Messages:
    836
    Location:
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    Well anyway, I would like to thank the OP for checking with his local code authority. It is always a good idea to find out what particular amendments that your state, county, city or whatever may have adopted. So perhaps a lot of confusion could have been avoided if that advise had been proffered in the first place and I apologize for not doing so.
  14. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Yes it would be fine with me although I would caution to use only approved for potable water use hose such as used by recreational vehicles (it is white). I would also mention the type of fittings needed to connect to the softener's plumbing connectors.
  15. nhmaster3015

    nhmaster3015 Master Plumber

    Messages:
    836
    Location:
    The granite state
    Well then, that about wraps it up fellas. :)
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