Sump Pump Modification for Radon Mitigation

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jmb3933

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I am looking to seal my sump pump that is currently not air tight to allow for a radon fan. Right next to my existing sump pump there is another opening that was cut and it’s unclear to me what is and if I can infill it. There are two old horizontal pipes that terminate here. One is about 6” in diameter and runs next to the footing of the interior load bearing wall (foundation drain?). The second is 1 3/4” and it looks like its coming from the bathroom(old drain?). Below it is what looks like another old rusted pipe going vertically 10’ down into the ground.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Tuttles Revenge

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Interesting idea.. we don't have radon here, and the only time I had to do anything with it, we just installed open pipe under the slab that vented to the roof.
 

jmb3933

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Interesting idea.. we don't have radon here, and the only time I had to do anything with it, we just installed open pipe under the slab that vented to the roof.
The approach you mentioned is the other way I have seen it in other homes in the area.

I am also looking to relocate the sump pump pit since it is currently in the middle of the hallway in our basement. That is the other reason I am trying to decide what is going on with these pipes on the right side of the sump pit because I would like to fill it all in and patch the slab. We had around 2" of rain followed by 6" of snow that melted over the weekend and there wasn't any water that entered the pit and both pipes remained dry the entire weekend. Not sure if the 6" pipe is a foundation drain. If it is, it doesn't seem to be effective. In the two years I have lived here I haven't heard the pump turn on once (it does work).
 

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I don't work on groundwater ever since I have no way to guarantee that I can control nature. But The sumps that I use for sewage ejectors are basically 24-30" ribbed sewer pipe that have fiberglass lids. The bottom gets epoxied and screwed onto the pipe to make it water tight, then the lid has a gasket and screwed down. Similar to what a lot of newer septic access lids are. Walkable and even drivable by riding lawn mowers. All of the utilities are drilled through the side of the sump with rubber grommets and the electrical runs through a conduit. This leaves a walkable sump and no utilities in the lid if it needs to be accessed.. much easier and cleaner.

Seems kinda weird that you have a groundwater pump that never gets any water in it. Could someone at some point installed something on the exterior that prevented water from entering the house to begin with?
 

jmb3933

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I don't work on groundwater ever since I have no way to guarantee that I can control nature. But The sumps that I use for sewage ejectors are basically 24-30" ribbed sewer pipe that have fiberglass lids. The bottom gets epoxied and screwed onto the pipe to make it water tight, then the lid has a gasket and screwed down. Similar to what a lot of newer septic access lids are. Walkable and even drivable by riding lawn mowers. All of the utilities are drilled through the side of the sump with rubber grommets and the electrical runs through a conduit. This leaves a walkable sump and no utilities in the lid if it needs to be accessed.. much easier and cleaner.

Seems kinda weird that you have a groundwater pump that never gets any water in it. Could someone at some point installed something on the exterior that prevented water from entering the house to begin with?
Not sure. No french drains, only roof gutters with gutter extensions. The grading isnt great everywhere around the perimeter, so I was going to install french drains in the spring.

It seems like they chose that location for the sump pit for a particular reason given that it is in a terribly inconvenient spot. The plumbing to the right seems to be the reason, but not sure what it is. I wonder if it was an old sewer line from the 1950s that was relocated/replaced at some point. Not sure why that small well of water to the right is 10' deep. It appears to be in some old vertical pipe. I'm starting to wonder if that was an old sewer junction point and the large pipe (6") was from the toilet and the small pipe (1 3/4") was from the shower/sink.
 

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If it were a sewage ejector, it should have had a air tight lid. Most dewatering sumps would have a lid that would keep most kids and debris out.
 

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Someone could have used it that way.. would stink pretty bad and pretty fast if it ever had a toilet dumping into it. Also would have a bunch of screw holes or captive nuts to seal the lid. Most likely just cobbled together to solve a problem that may or may not currently exist..

But if you're moving it, now you have the opportunity to make it work best for you now. If it were me I would reconnect the old lines even if I didn't know their true purpose. In the meantime you have an opportunity to check their path if you wanted. Cable snake with camera and radio beacon to locate them?
 

jmb3933

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Someone could have used it that way.. would stink pretty bad and pretty fast if it ever had a toilet dumping into it. Also would have a bunch of screw holes or captive nuts to seal the lid. Most likely just cobbled together to solve a problem that may or may not currently exist..

But if you're moving it, now you have the opportunity to make it work best for you now. If it were me I would reconnect the old lines even if I didn't know their true purpose. In the meantime you have an opportunity to check their path if you wanted. Cable snake with camera and radio beacon to locate them?
Any idea what kind of pipe this is? This is the vertical pipe going 10’ into the ground.
 

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Never seen that pattern on the interior of a pipe before.. No clue as to what it is or was.
 
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