Sewer backflow valve: Do I need one?

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AlGreen

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I could use some perspective from the plumbers here on whether I should be looking into installing (or having installed) a backflow preventer in our main line. We've been in this house (built circa 1926) for about five years, and haven't had any significant clogs or issues with the line to this point. But then I start thinking about the worst-case scenario and cost of remediation to our basement, should anything happen.
 

Reach4

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I am not a plumber.

Ask folks at the sewer department, or ask the neighbors downhill, if the sewers ever back up.

If you do put in a valve, a flapper valve is going to leak. Overhead sewers, where basement water gets pumped up, is best. "Normally open" backwater valves can work and normally don't get stuck open by debris.
 

AlGreen

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I know sewers back up. The question is what, if anything, I should do to prevent it from happening in my home.

Or to put it another way, since sewers do back up, should every residence everywhere should have a backflow preventer?
 

Reach4

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I know sewers back up. The question is what, if anything, I should do to prevent it from happening in my home.

Or to put it another way, since sewers do back up, should every residence everywhere should have a backflow preventer?
No. Some should have overhead sewers.

So next you say, ok, should should every residence everywhere without overhead sewers have a backflow preventer?
I would say no. Single story houses with a crawl space that are not in low areas would probably not need one... And next you say, ok, should should every residence everywhere ....

I don't need a backflow preventer with my septic and overhead sewers.

If I were on a sewer, if I don't have a lower basement that the people downstream of me, and those people have not flooded, I would think a backup is not going to help. When those people flood, and put in measures, the problem moves up hill.

I would say that if you are going to put in an anti-backup valve, get one that works. Most in my non-pro opinion won't work because they are those flappers that leak.

And again, I would talk to the sewer people. I think they are likely to be forthcoming.
 
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AlGreen

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No. Some should have overhead sewers.

So next you say, ok, should should every residence everywhere without overhead sewers have a backflow preventer?
I would say no. Single story houses with a crawl space that are not in low areas would probably not need one... And next you say, ok, should should every residence everywhere ....

Nope, I wasn't going to say any of that. :rolleyes:

Back to my original question, what determines whether a home should have a backflow preventer installed?
 

Jeff H Young

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A backwater valve is required when the cover of the nearest upstream manhole is above the flood rim of the lowest fixture in the building.
Yes thats when I put in backwater valves . Ive never installed one when it wasent required . I dont think you can put one on just because your looking for protection.
 
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