Seal PVC Pipe Through Concrete

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Joseph Skoler

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Thank you all again so much.

I will use hydraulic cement between hole in concrete and sleeve; and silicone sealer between sleeve and pipe.

When I made the hole, I angled it slightly down so any water would move from inside to outside. I think I can probably get the hydraulic cement into the hole (around the sleeve) from inside by pushing it in and moving the sleeve a little bit (and then propping in place to dry).

For the silicone, I can get at it from both inside and out.

Will take pics and report back.
 

Jeff H Young

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I would guess beside sealing the penetration there will be waterproofing on wall and a method /system of collecting directing water away from foundation like French drain?
 

wwhitney

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/system of collecting directing water away from foundation like French drain
Yes, if there's a foundation drain it would make sense to me to enlarge the filter fabric covered gravel pocket to include all of the sleeve outside of the main house foundation. That should eliminate or at least reduce any hydrostratic pressure that could develop. Not sure if you still have access to do that.

Hopefully there isn't a porch post directly over your sleeve. Then your fallback approach if the measures discussed so far don't solve the leaking is to cut out say 12" of the porch footing over the sleeve so that you can access the exterior side of your foundation and your foundation drain.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Joseph Skoler

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I would guess beside sealing the penetration there will be waterproofing on wall and a method /system of collecting directing water away from foundation like French drain?

Well, yes, the rocks shown in the picture beneath the sleeve are part of a huge french drain, around the entire perimeter of the house and continuing off both front corners of the house downhill to the road. So, there shouldn't be any water pressure build up where these pipes are.
 

Joseph Skoler

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Yes, if there's a foundation drain it would make sense to me to enlarge the filter fabric covered gravel pocket to include all of the sleeve outside of the main house foundation. That should eliminate or at least reduce any hydrostratic pressure that could develop. Not sure if you still have access to do that.

Hopefully there isn't a porch post directly over your sleeve. Then your fallback approach if the measures discussed so far don't solve the leaking is to cut out say 12" of the porch footing over the sleeve so that you can access the exterior side of your foundation and your foundation drain.

Cheers, Wayne

I've got to think more about this: Enlarge the drainage portion to surround the pipe and sleeve vs. encase it in concrete?
 

wwhitney

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Definite vote against encasing things in concrete. The 6" pipe (outside the sleeve) should not have concrete cast directly against it, as discussed. And concrete isn't going to actually seal reliably against anything (it shrinks as it cures), so all it will do will be to make things much harder to access if your leak returns and you need to take additional measures.

Whereas gravel is something that you can excavate if needed, and it can provide an alternate drainage path to keep storm water away from your sleeve.

Cheers, Wayne
 

BostonGuido

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I have a related question. I have a rain water cistern and the inlet and overflow pipes (3" PVC) penetrate the wall at the top of the 7' deep cistern (obviously). The pipe penetration was done by placing an ordinary 3" nominal PVC coupler through the poured concrete wall when it was poured. The PVC pipes were then passed through the coupler when the concrete was cured and the forms removed. The pipes were not bonded with PVC cement to the coupler, they were just caulked from the outside. This failed after a year or so (now 5 years on) and recently I picked out the old caulk and sealed it with 3M5200 when the joint was dry (water lower in the cistern). I did a good job of that. Now we just got a lot of rain and both places are seeping - much less than before, but still some leakage down the outside wall which causes mold/mildew. I think there must be another leak path between the concrete and the OD of the coupler. Builder says he didn't treat it with anything special. Wall is 10" thick. My proposed solution is to wait for joint to day again, then wick in some really thin (watery) liquid that will cure, and I'm asking the forum what to use. I know cyanoacrylate (superglue) comes in very low viscosity formulations (McMaster) and there are some very low viscosity epoxies used for electrical coil impregnation (not researched carefully yet). Does anyone know or have experience with what will work best?
 

Reach4

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I have no experience with Sodium Silicate ("Water Glass"), but there is something to look up.

How about using that marine adhesive from inside?
 

BostonGuido

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I have no experience with Sodium Silicate ("Water Glass"), but there is something to look up.

How about using that marine adhesive from inside?

Interesting suggestion - water glass. Have not heard that mentioned since I was in high school. Will investigate. Inside is not accessible. Thanks!
 

BostonGuido

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Having done some research on this, I'm not clear on whether water glass needs to be heated after it is applied to get it to the hardened state, or whether simple evaporation will work to "set" it so it does not just re-dissolve. I can probably wick it into the tiny gap via capillary action but it would be very difficult to heat.
Thoughts? References?
 

BostonGuido

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So I'm looking at things that I could wick in, and cyanoacrylate adhesives (superglues) come in a few very thin (low viscosity) formulations. Loctite 420, 493 and 4014 are available from McMaster and are the viscosity of alcohol so I'm hoping those would wick into the joint after it is good and dry. Anyone ever used CA adhesives on concrete and/or PCV? There's also MasterBond eP30LV-1 which is a 2-part epoxy, and Permabond 101. Any experience?
 
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