Regen Periodically with High Salt Dose?

Users who are viewing this thread

samgillis

New Member
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
California
Hey everybody,

I just installed a Culligan 10" downflow softener myself and got it working great. Hardness is only about 17gpg and my salt dose is 6lbs.

I have read that having lower doses can mean you're only regenerating the resin higher up in the tank/you're only using the resin higher in the tank and ultimately don't get full and efficient use of the total capacity.

Would it, therefore, be beneficial to periodically regen with a higher salt dose to get all the resin "turning over" more?

If I'm completely off base then please let me know. I'm new to the workings of softener systems.
 

Mswlogo

Member
Messages
93
Reaction score
9
Points
8
Location
New Hampshire
6 lbs per regen sounds really low for that much hardness.

Are you sure it’s not 6 lbs / cu ft?

17 gpg is considered extremely hard water.

How many cu ft resin do you have?

How have you set up all your other parameters?
 

samgillis

New Member
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
California
My TDS is 275 on the high side, so just rounded up to 300 and calculated that to be around 17 gpg, which I know is hard but didn't think was extremely hard. My previous house's TDS was over 1000 so that's what I consider extremely hard.

I went with a higher average consumption of 100 gallons per day, so 1700 grains per day. It's a 1.5 cu ft resin tank. The manual lists the efficiency dosage as 4463g/6lb salt dosage, so that's what I went with since it seemed like I wasn't going to use up the capacity very quickly.
 

Reach4

Well-Known Member
Messages
39,050
Reaction score
4,490
Points
113
Location
IL
The resin gets shuffled up during backwash. If it is working well enough for you, be happy. If it starts getting hardness leakage, you can adjust something then.

I do agree that 6 lbs of salt for 1.5 cuft of resin is too light for most people.
 

Bannerman

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,889
Reaction score
811
Points
113
Location
Ontario, Canada
A 10" diameter tank will most commonly contain 1.5 cubic feet (ft3) of media.

Although Salt settings are most often stated as lbs per ft3, many softeners require the total salt amount to be programmed for the specific amount of capacity to be regenerated. For for a softener containing 1.5 of resin, a 6 lb/ft3 setting will require 9 lbs salt total, which will typically regenerate 31,500 grains of useable capacity per cycle.

Lower, more efficient salt settings involve compromise as hardness leakage through the resin will increase in proportion to the salt and capacity settings. Since less salt will regenerate less capacity, the regeneration frequency will be increased, so a greater amount of water will be consumed for regeneration (=lower water efficiency) when considered on a monthly or annual basis.

For the best balance of soft water quality, useable capacity and salt efficiency, 8 lbs/ft3 is usually recommended to regenerate 36,000 grains of useable capacity in 1.5 ft3 resin, which will provide a hardness reduction efficiency of 3,000 grains per lb of salt.

The amount of hardness leakage (= soft water quality) stated in the chart below, is based on the resin initially containing the maximum hardness reduction capacity. Since 1 ft3 resin will typically have a maximum total hardness reduction capacity of 32,000 grains, then 1.5 ft3 will total 48,000 grains capacity.

Because a lower capacity setting will cause regeneration to occur sooner, the resin's total capacity will not be depleted so less salt will be needed to 'top up' the resin's capacity.

As service water flow is downward through the resin, the resin's capacity near the top of the tank will become most depleted, with less depletion occuring progressively downward towards the bottom of the resin bed. Because the backwash cycle will reclassify the resin granules within the tank, many of the most depleted resin granules from the top, will be moved throughout the tank including to the bottom.

Since the brine will become progressively weaker as it flows down through the resin, a low salt dose will more progressively have less regenerative strength as it flows to the bottom of the tank, so the depleted resin closer to the bottom, will not be fully regenerated, and so that resin will not be as effective in reducing hardness, which will result in higher hardness leakage.

Although the resin granules will be reclassified during each backwash cycle, the amount of not fully regenerated granules throughout the tank, will eventually remain consistant for each salt amount, which is how the hardness leakage amount was determined for each salt setting.

index.php
 
Last edited:

Bannerman

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,889
Reaction score
811
Points
113
Location
Ontario, Canada
My TDS is 275 on the high side, so just rounded up to 300 and calculated that to be around 17 gpg,
TDS is not a hardness measurement.

TDS means Total Dissolved Solids, which is a measurement of a non specific range of dissolved solids within the water. Since a water softener employs ion exchange to replace hardness mineral ions such as calcium and magnesium, replacing each with sodium ions, softening will not reduce TDS. Since an electronic TDS meter measures water conductivity to estimate an amount of TDS, depending on the actual hardness amount, the TDS for softened water will often increase due to the higher conductivity of sodium compared to calcium.

Measurement of water hardness, requires a test kit designed to measure total hardness. The usual recommendation is to obtain a Hach 5B Total Hardness test kit, which utilizes chemical titration to directly measure the specific grains per gallon hardness for both raw and soft water. Hardness test strips are not accurate nor recommended.
 
Last edited:

Mswlogo

Member
Messages
93
Reaction score
9
Points
8
Location
New Hampshire
My TDS is 275 on the high side, so just rounded up to 300 and calculated that to be around 17 gpg, which I know is hard but didn't think was extremely hard. My previous house's TDS was over 1000 so that's what I consider extremely hard.

I went with a higher average consumption of 100 gallons per day, so 1700 grains per day. It's a 1.5 cu ft resin tank. The manual lists the efficiency dosage as 4463g/6lb salt dosage, so that's what I went with since it seemed like I wasn't going to use up the capacity very quickly.
With those numbers you’d be regen-ing every 2.5 days. That’s 22 40 Lb bags of salt a year. Most systems are sized to regen between 7-14 days.

Besides getting something to measure hardness you should probably get a full professional water test and make sure there isn’t any other problems besides hardness. And make sure you measure close to the same number they get on hardness.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks